Page 156 of 340 FirstFirst ... 56106146154155156157158166206256 ... LastLast
Results 1,551 to 1,560 of 3391

Thread: Genetic Genealogy & Ancient DNA in the News (TITLES/ABSTRACTS ONLY)

  1. #1551
    Registered Users
    Posts
    4,850
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by lukaszM View Post
    I read that in this cemetary they found besides few human graves, also horse grave (about 950-1050 AD). If it tells us something, considering Siberian C5c1?

    http://dabrowachelminska.lo.pl/?cid=271
    C5c1 is native to East Central Europe. It's got nothing to do with any Siberians within a reasonable time frame.

    http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthre...l=1#post273740

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Generalissimo For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (08-23-2017),  ffoucart (08-28-2017),  Hando (08-27-2017),  lgmayka (08-23-2017),  lukaszM (08-23-2017),  Saetro (08-23-2017),  T101 (08-29-2017),  Tomenable (09-04-2017),  Waldemar (08-23-2017)

  3. #1552
    Banned
    Posts
    6,336
    Sex
    Location
    Torun
    Ethnicity
    Central 75% + 25% Mazovia
    Nationality
    Pole
    Y-DNA (P)
    R1a > M198 > YP 1337

    Poland
    Quote Originally Posted by Generalissimo View Post
    C5c1 is native to East Central Europe. It's got nothing to do with any Siberians within a reasonable time frame.

    http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthre...l=1#post273740
    Ok, I followed only what was in abstract about it:
    we identified the atypical haplogroup C5c1, which suggests Asian origin of the studied individuals and confirms our previous reports concerning ancient human migrations from Asia to the territory of present-day Poland.
    .
    Thank for clayfying.
    Last edited by lukaszM; 08-23-2017 at 11:49 PM.

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to lukaszM For This Useful Post:

     Generalissimo (08-24-2017),  Hando (08-27-2017)

  5. #1553
    Banned
    Posts
    81
    Sex

    Quote Originally Posted by Generalissimo View Post
    C5c1 is native to East Central Europe. It's got nothing to do with any Siberians within a reasonable time frame.
    Hilarious. This is a new low even for him. The paper says C5c1 has an MRCA 4-9 Kya, even shallower than the Asian clade of R1a.

  6. #1554
    Registered Users
    Posts
    104
    Sex
    Omitted
    Location
    Belgium
    Ethnicity
    who the hell knows
    Nationality
    Belgian

    Italy Belgium
    Quote Originally Posted by rhad View Post
    Hilarious. This is a new low even for him. The paper says C5c1 has an MRCA 4-9 Kya, even shallower than the Asian clade of R1a.
    Who are you talking about?

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Inigo Montoya For This Useful Post:

     Hando (08-27-2017)

  8. #1555
    Banned
    Posts
    81
    Sex

    talking about Davidski.
    P.S.This thread actually is reserved only for news. There is a separate thread for discussion.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to rhad For This Useful Post:

     Hando (08-27-2017)

  10. #1556
    Registered Users
    Posts
    525
    Sex

    an interview with david reich

    https://www.laphamsquarterly.org/roundtable/deeper-deep

    Deeper Than Deep

    "“Tell me just what your day was like today.”

    I spent the morning corresponding with an archaeologist in Kazakhstan. We’re trying to do genetics in the Bronze Age and the pre–Bronze Age variants in Kazakhstan.”

    “Pre–Bronze Age, okay. And when’s Bronze Age?”

    “Bronze Age begins about 4,000 years ago and ends about 2,500 years ago. So the Mycenaeans and the Minoans of Greece are Bronze Age peoples. The earliest biblical period is the Bronze Age period. And King David and King Solomon are the beginning of the Iron Age period. The Philistines are the beginning of the Iron Age, which is more technologically advanced.”

    “And when is Homer?”

    “Homer is writing about the Bronze Age from a later time that was already the Iron Age. It was a technological revolution that’s erupting in Greece, across the Mediterranean.”

    “So you’re now corresponding with this guy in Kazakhstan about—?”

    We’d like to characterize the genetic variation in Kazakhstan because it’s a key connection point between the regions south of the Hindu Kush mountains, Iran and India in the south, the steppes in Russia in the north, in China in the East; it’s all mixing up there. And we’re trying to understand the connections. It’s a place of movement and migration, and understanding the genetics is interesting. So that was my morning, and then I spent some hours talking with colleagues today in the laboratory about ancient farmers of Israel and Iran that we have some data from.”

    “Ancient farmers of Iran?”

    And Israel from about eight thousand to nine thousand years ago that we have some data from. And then I spent some time talking to a colleague talking about ancient Africans.”

    “Where did you get the ancient farmer data from Iran from?”

    “From the University of Pennsylvania Museum; there’s bones in the basement, and they drilled those bones and got the DNA from those bones.”

    “There are scientists in my laboratory working on East Asian population history. We have data from a lot of present-day people from Tibet, from China, different ethnic groups within China, Southeast Asia. Very little is known about East Asian population history in comparison to European and Near Eastern population history, and we’re trying to rectify that. We have a little ancient DNA but not much. Mostly this is modern DNA from present-day people.”

    “There are some places in the world where it’s impossible to get bones from. It’s very difficult to get samples out of China. Getting bones out of China is basically impossible or nearly impossible, because they refuse to export human remains. This type of work needs to be done through collaboration with Chinese scientists if we’re going to get ancient DNA.”

  11. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to paoloferrari For This Useful Post:

     DebbieK (08-25-2017),  Dewsloth (08-25-2017),  Hando (08-27-2017),  Helen (08-27-2017),  kostoffj (08-25-2017),  MfA (08-26-2017),  parasar (08-26-2017),  Pribislav (08-25-2017),  Principe (08-25-2017),  rms2 (08-25-2017),  rozenfeld (08-25-2017),  Saetro (08-27-2017)

  12. #1557
    Registered Users
    Posts
    547
    Sex
    Location
    United States

    United States of America Catalonia Spain
    The maternal genetic make-up of the Iberian Peninsula between the Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age

    Anna Szecsenyi-Nagy et al

    Agriculture first reached the Iberian Peninsula around 5700 BCE. However, little is known about the genetic structure and changes of prehistoric populations in different geographic areas of Iberia. In our study, we focused on the maternal genetic makeup of the Neolithic (~ 5500-3000 BCE), Chalcolithic (~ 3000-2200 BCE) and Early Bronze Age (~ 2200-1500 BCE). We report ancient mitochondrial DNA results of 213 individuals (151 HVS-I sequences) from the northeast, central, southeast and southwest regions and thus on the largest archaeogenetic dataset from the Peninsula to date. Similar to other parts of Europe, we observe a discontinuity between hunter-gatherers and the first farmers of the Neolithic. During the subsequent periods, we detect regional continuity of Early Neolithic lineages across Iberia, however the genetic contribution of hunter-gatherers is generally higher than in other parts of Europe and varies regionally. In contrast to ancient DNA findings from Central Europe, we do not observe a major turnover in the mtDNA record of the Iberian Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age, suggesting that the population history of the Iberian Peninsula is distinct in character.

    http://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/08/21/106963


  13. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to Isidro For This Useful Post:

     ArmandoR1b (08-28-2017),  bix (08-28-2017),  Hando (08-31-2017),  Megalophias (08-28-2017),  palamede (08-29-2017),  parasar (08-30-2017),  R.Rocca (08-30-2017),  razyn (08-28-2017),  RCO (08-28-2017),  Ruderico (08-28-2017),  vettor (08-28-2017)

  14. #1558
    Registered Users
    Posts
    547
    Sex
    Location
    United States

    United States of America Catalonia Spain
    • Researchers find a thousand bone remains of hominids in excavations this summer
    • Harvard University to conduct genetic studies



    The head of the research, which has been developed again during the months of June and July, stressed that they have also found around one thousand new human remains of the Neolithic, whose antiquity ranges from 6,000 to 7,000 years .Of these findings, 20 samples have been sent to Harvard University in the United States for genetic studies.

    http://www.eldiadecordoba.es/provinc...167483597.html


  15. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to Isidro For This Useful Post:

     A Norfolk L-M20 (08-30-2017),  ArmandoR1b (09-01-2017),  ddugas (08-30-2017),  DebbieK (08-30-2017),  epoch (08-31-2017),  Hando (08-31-2017),  Jean M (08-30-2017),  paoloferrari (08-30-2017),  parasar (08-30-2017),  Passa (09-01-2017),  R.Rocca (08-30-2017),  rozenfeld (08-30-2017)

  16. #1559
    Registered Users
    Posts
    525
    Sex

    Neanderthals and Denisovans as biological invaders

    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/20...163114.extract

    "Humans stand out among our close primate relatives as effective biological invaders. Our recent history has included range expansions into remote and harsh geographic regions, and invasions by some populations into areas long occupied by others. Historians tend to frame these events as a story of technological and economic progress, while admitting that disease sometimes plays a central part—a triad made memorable by Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies (1). Ancient DNA is revealing a deeper prehistory of human dispersals, however, showing continuity with invasions as understood by biologists, not just historians. Now, in PNAS, Rogers et al. (2) find that not only modern humans but also Neanderthals and Denisovans may share a surprisingly invasive origin.

    The story of Neanderthal and Denisovan origins has developed rapidly during the past 7 y. Two high-coverage genomes, and more fragmentary genome data from a handful of other individuals, have yielded powerful insights about the diversity of these ancient groups and their legacy of genetic introgression into recent humans (3). These archaic populations share a deep common history, and individual genomes record a history of high inbreeding and low gene flow across their ancient geographic ranges (4, 5). In their new study, Rogers et al. (2) find that the common ancestral population of the Denisovans and Neanderthals underwent a tight bottleneck, immediately after this population diverged from the African ancestors of modern humans. This bottleneck was rapid, maybe only 300 generations, and the Neanderthal and Denisovan populations separated quickly thereafter.

    This archaic human dispersal, which unfolded more than 600 ka, bears a striking parallel to the much later dispersal of modern humans from Africa into Eurasia after 100 ka. In both cases, the small bottleneck is etched into the genomes of all their descendants, and in both cases, this founder "

  17. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to paoloferrari For This Useful Post:

     Hando (09-09-2017),  JonikW (09-01-2017),  Megalophias (09-01-2017),  palamede (09-01-2017)

  18. #1560
    Registered Users
    Posts
    525
    Sex

    The Sommersdorf mummies—An interdisciplinary investigation on human remains from a 17th-19th century aristocratic crypt in southern Germany

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0183588

    "Abstract

    Sommersdorf Castle (Bavaria, Germany) is a medieval castle complex which has been inhabited by the aristocratic family von Crailsheim. The deceased were entombed in a crypt located in the parapets underneath the castle’s church, resulting in mummification of the bodies. Based on the family chronicle and oral history, identities have been ascribed to the mummies. The aim of the study is therefore to test the accuracy of the historical records in comparison to archaeological, anthropological and genetic data. Today, the crypt houses eleven wooden coffins from the 17th to 19th century AD. In ten of these, mummified and scattered human remains were found. Archive records were studied in order to identify names, ancestry, titles, occupation, date of birth and death, and place of interment of the individuals. The coffins were visually inspected and dated by typo-chronology, and the mummified and scattered skeletal remains were subjected to a physical anthropological examination. In total, the crypt contains the remains of a minimum number of nine individuals, among them three adult males, five adult females and one infant. A detailed scientific examination, including prior conservation, ancient DNA analyses, and computed tomography (CT), was performed on five mummies. By means of the CT data age at death, sex, body height, pathologies, and anatomical variants were investigated. CT analysis further showed that the bodies were naturally mummified. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed that the tested individuals are not maternally related. In addition, health, living conditions and circumstances of death of the entombed individuals could be highlighted. Being confronted with the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of each methodological approach, probable identification was achieved in two cases"

  19. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to paoloferrari For This Useful Post:

     Hando (09-09-2017),  Jean M (09-02-2017),  rozenfeld (09-02-2017)

Page 156 of 340 FirstFirst ... 56106146154155156157158166206256 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5239
    Last Post: 11-28-2021, 02:45 AM
  2. Genetic Genealogy Etiquette
    By memianec88 in forum General
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-31-2018, 03:35 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-10-2016, 06:25 PM
  4. Genetic Genealogy Standards
    By Jean M in forum Other
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-18-2015, 11:23 AM
  5. Genetic Genealogy Ireland 2014
    By DebbieK in forum General
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-01-2014, 01:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •