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Thread: New version of paper of Iain Mathieson: Eight thousand years of natural selection

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    New version of paper of Iain Mathieson: Eight thousand years of natural selection

    New version of paper of Iain Mathieson: Eight thousand years of natural selection in Europe
    This paper includes new samples from:
    * Anatolia Neolithic (n=26 samples)
    * Iberia Chalcolithic: El Mirador Cave (n=14 samples)
    * Neolithic samples from Mittelelbe-Saale, Germany (n=15)
    * Hunter-gatherer sample: Karelia Russia (n=1)
    * Khvalynsk Eneolithic in the Volga steppes: Saratovo, Russia (n=3)
    * Middle Bronze Age Poltavka culture, Samara, Russia (n=5)
    * Late Middle Bronze Age (MBA2) Potapovka culture, Samara, Russia (n=3)
    * Late Bronze Age Srubnaya culture, Samara, Russia (n=14)

    Principal component analysis of 777 modern West Eurasian samples (grey), with 221 ancient samples projected onto the first two principal component axes and labeled by culture. Abbreviations: [E/M/L]N Early/Middle/Late Neolithic, LBK Linearbandkeramik, [E/W]HG Eastern/Western hunter-gatherer, [E]BA [Early] Bronze Age, IA Iron Age:
    PCA_Mathieson.jpg

    From Supplementary_Data_Table_1:
    Anatolia_Neolithic: Y haplogroup: 7 G2a, 1 G, 2 H2, 1 H, 1 I, 1 I2c, 1 J2a, 1 C1a2
    El Mirador Iberia Chalcolithic: 2 G2a, 4 I2a, 2 I
    Yamnaya Steppe: 11 R1b, 1 I2a (3300-2600 BC)
    Poltavka Steppe: 4 R1b, 1 R1a (2900-2200 BC)
    Srubnaya Steppe: 6 R1a (1900-1200 BC)
    So R1a replaced R1b in the Steppe around 2000 BC

    From the paper:
    To understand population transformations in the Eurasian steppe, we analyzed a time transect of 37 samples from the Samara region spanning ~5600-300 BCE and including the Eastern Hunter
    gatherer (EHG), Eneolithic, Yamnaya, Poltavka, Potapovka and Srubnaya cultures. Admixture between populations of Near Eastern ancestry and the EHG7 began as early as the Eneolithic (5200- 4000 BCE), with some individuals resembling EHG and some resembling Yamnaya (Fig. 1b; Extended Data Fig. 2). The Yamnaya from Samara and Kalmykia, the Afanasievo people from the Altai (3300- 3000 BCE), and the Poltavka Middle Bronze Age (2900-2200 BCE) population that followed the Yamnaya in Samara, are all genetically homogeneous, forming a tight “Bronze Age steppe” cluster in PCA (Fig. 1b), sharing predominantly R1b Y-chromosomes5,7 (Supplementary Data Table 1), and having 48-58% ancestry from an Armenian-like Near Eastern source (Extended Data Table 3) without additional Anatolian Neolithic or Early European Farmer (EEF) ancestry7 (Extended Data Fig. 2). After the Poltavka period, population change occurred in Samara: the Late Bronze Age Srubnaya have ~17% Anatolian Neolithic or EEF ancestry (Extended Data Fig. 2). Previous work documented that such ancestry appeared east of the Urals beginning at least by the time of the Sintashta culture, and suggested that it reflected an eastward migration from the Corded Ware peoples of central Europe5. However, the fact that the Srubnaya also harbored such ancestry indicates that the Anatolian Neolithic or EEF ancestry could have come into the steppe from a more eastern source. Further evidence that migrations originating as far west as central Europe may not have had an important impact on the Late Bronze Age steppe comes from the fact that the Srubnaya possess exclusively (n=6) R1a Ychromosomes (Extended Data Table 1), and four of them (and one Poltavka male) belonged to haplogroup R1a-Z93 which is common in central/south Asians12, very rare in present-day Europeans, and absent in all ancient central Europeans studied to date.

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    I just want to say that I am still dissapointed by that big ugly hole (lack of samples) between Samara and West Poland.
    Middle Dnieper, Sredny Stog, etc...

    Also there are many Zvejnieki site skeletons from Baltics waiting for analysis...

    Now on results - the J EHG is interesting, will try to look for his anthro descriptions in Soviet sources when I have time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by parastais View Post
    I just want to say that I am still dissapointed by that big ugly hole (lack of samples) between Samara and West Poland.
    Middle Dnieper, Sredny Stog, etc...

    Also there are many Zvejnieki site skeletons from Baltics waiting for analysis...

    Now on results - the J EHG is interesting, will try to look for his anthro descriptions in Soviet sources when I have time.
    The EHG J male did not contain any Near Eastern ancestry and I would say that he belongs to a WHG lineage, which was simply not successful in surviving. But that is very interesting and some J was probably arriving already with I carriers in Europe but it seems that they died out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coldmountains View Post
    The EHG J male did not contain any Near Eastern ancestry and I would say that he belongs to a WHG lineage, which was simply not successful in surviving. But that is very interesting and some J was probably arriving already with I carriers in Europe but it seems that they died out.
    Yep, autosomally he is EHG like the other Karelia sample and the Samara sample. Soviet physical anthropologists proposed the EHG site in Karelia to be a mix of two populations which I previously doubted, so far looks like I was right to do so. European hunter-gatherer sites in general should be expected to be homogenous.

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    Quote Originally Posted by parastais View Post
    I just want to say that I am still dissapointed by that big ugly hole (lack of samples) between Samara and West Poland.
    Middle Dnieper, Sredny Stog, etc...

    Also there are many Zvejnieki site skeletons from Baltics waiting for analysis...

    Now on results - the J EHG is interesting, will try to look for his anthro descriptions in Soviet sources when I have time.
    Y-DNA J EHG wow!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coldmountains View Post
    The EHG J male did not contain any Near Eastern ancestry and I would say that he belongs to a WHG lineage, which was simply not successful in surviving. But that is very interesting and some J was probably arriving already with I carriers in Europe but it seems that they died out.
    Wow no doubt! J in Mesolithic Europe!

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    Can anyone give me more info on the J boy?
    For example, R1a boy was "AE RAS collection number 5773-74, grave number 142"
    I have material where in Russian their anthro type is discussed, but I need their grave number or similar?

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    Quote Originally Posted by parastais View Post
    Can anyone give me more info on the J boy?
    For example, R1a boy was "AE RAS collection number 5773-74, grave number 142"
    I have material where in Russian their anthro type is discussed, but I need their grave number or similar?
    Hunter-gatherer sample: Karelia Russia (n=1)
    In this study we added another individual from the ~5500 BCE Mesolithic site Yuzhnyy
    Oleni Ostrov (an island in Lake Onega) in Karelia, Western Russia, to the one reported in ref.
    16. Mitochondrial data from seven other individuals from the same site have been described22.
    • I0221 / UZ0040
    MAE RAS collection number 5773-40, grave number 39/1. This is genetically male.
    E-M84>FGC18389>FGC18413>FGC18401>FGC18422>Y99171 tMRCA 2550ybp

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coldmountains View Post
    But that is very interesting and some J was probably arriving already with I carriers in Europe but it seems that they died out.
    #N14134 of Lithuania has tested

    PF5050+ PF5058+ PF7384-

    On YFull's current haplotree, he would be either J-PF5008* or J-L581*. The J-PF5008 clade diverged from the rest of J2-M410 over 18,000 years ago.

    #159759 of Russia has tested P279+ , which is farther downstream but still within J-PF5008.

    And of course, Central-Eastern European J-Z1828 diverged from the rest of J1-Z2217 over 18,000 years ago.
    Last edited by lgmayka; 10-11-2015 at 10:12 AM.

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