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Thread: Genetic Genealogy & Ancient DNA in the News (TITLES/ABSTRACTS ONLY)

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    Quote Originally Posted by gravetti View Post
    http://www.khazaria.com/genetics/chuvashes.html

    "A sample of 96 unrelated individuals from Chuvashia, Russia was sequenced for hypervariable region-I (HVR-I) of the mtDNA molecule. The Chuvash speak a Turkic language that is not mutually intelligible to other extant Turkish groups, and their genetics are distinct from Turkic-speaking Altaic groups. Some scholars have suggested that they are remnants of the Golden Horde, while others have advocated that they are the products of admixture between Turkic and Finno-Ugric speakers who came into contact during the 13th century. Earlier genetic research using autosomal DNA markers suggested a Finno-Ugric origin for the Chuvash. This study examines non-recombining DNA markers to better elucidate their origins. The majority of individuals in this sample exhibit haplogroups H (31%), U (22%), and K (11%), all representative of western and northern Europeans, but absent in Altaic or Mongolian populations. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) was used to examine distances between the Chuvash and 8 reference populations compiled from the literature. Mismatch analysis showed a unimodal distribution. Along with neutrality tests (Tajima's D (-1.43365) p < 0.05, Fu's FS (-25.50518) p < 0.001), the mismatch distribution is suggestive of an expanding population. These tests suggest that the Chuvash are not related to the Altai and Mongolia along their maternal line but supports the 'Elite' hypothesis that their language was imposed by a conquering group — leaving Chuvash mtDNA largely of Eurasian origin with a small amount of Central Asian gene flow. Their maternal markers appear to most closely resemble Finno-Ugric speakers rather than fellow Turkic speakers."

    http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/cgi/...biol_preprints


    Results and Discussion
    From the analysis of 228 clone sequences we have obtained the mtDNA HVS-I in 13 individuals,
    showing 12 independent haplotypes. They were further classified into 10 mtDNA haplogroups:
    H, H1, H5, H13, HV1, J, J1, T, T2 and U3 (Table 2; Achilli et al. 2007; Karachanak et al. 2012;
    Richards et al. 2002; Soares et al. 2010; Torroni et al. 2001).
    We compared haplogroups in our ancient samples to those in modern Bulgarian samples
    previously analyzed (Karachanak et al., 2012).
    The main haplogroup H, prevalent in European populations has 41.9 % frequency in
    modern Bulgarians (Karachanak, S. et al., 2012) and it is observed in seven out of thirteen proto-
    Bulgarian samples.
    So the YDNA is Turkic?

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    About populations of Middle Volga and Bulgarians in Eurogenes K15

    _______________________Atlantic_North Sea_Baltic_East Euro_West Med_West Asian_East Med_Red Sea_South Asian_SE Asian_Siberian_Amerindian_Oceanian_NE African_Sub Saharan
    Chuvash (turkic)__________13.39_____5.79___13.51___36.16__ ___0.88______3.35_____0.88_____0.53_____1.97______ _2.49___17.74_____2.43_______0.44_____ 0.19____0.26
    Erzya (finnic)_____________16.81____10.25___27.65___29.0 7_____2.72______3.63_____1.14_____0.34_____1.23___ ____0.51____5.13_____1.22_______0.03_____0.13____0 .13
    Mar_____________________11.36_____4.78___11.39___3 8.39_____0.23______1.36______0.23_____0.09____3.86 ________0.80___23.79_____2.83_______0.28_____0.10_ ___0.51
    Tatar (turkic)_____________14.47____10.7___16.22____22.1 7_____2.71_____9.60______1.41_____0.73_____2.41___ ____2.97____14.22____1.72________0.19____0.11_____ 0.4

    Bulgarian (Slavic)________12.88____15.88___16.38____9.34____ 13.76______11.88____16.27____2.18_____0.26________ 0.17_____0.14_____0.3________0.28______0.18___0.11

    If we compare South-East Asian+Siberian+Ameridian

    1) Mari (finnic)____________: 27.42%
    2) Chuvash (turkic)________: 22.66%
    3) Tatar (turkic)___________: 19.91% but 9.60% for West Asian
    4) Erzya (finnic)___________: 6,86%
    5) Bulgarian (Slavic)_______: 0.51%

    The score of Maris is surprising, maybe the sample is not representative. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mari_people
    Last edited by palamede; 06-06-2015 at 01:40 PM.

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    Ninth ISABS Conference on Forensic and Anthropologic Genetics (22-26 June 2015) Abstract number: ABS-427-ISABS-2015 : http://www.isabs.hr/registration2013...d_abstract=427

    THE FIRST GENOMIC DATA FROM ANATOLIA AND ITS IMPACTS ON EUROPEAN NEOLITHICS
    Omrak, Günther, Valdiosera, Skoglund, Kiesewetter, Aylward, Storĺ, Jakobsson, Götherström


    The most important process in the prehistory of our species is arguably the Neolithization. In the course of 10000 years, it took us from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to the society we live in today. For Eurasia, Anatolia and the Near East played a key role in this process. It has already been shown that the neolithic expansion from this area and westwards was driven by migration. But we know little about the actual establishing of neolithic societies in Anatolia, and on what kind of population dynamics effected their gene pool. And we also know little more about the Neolithic gene flow from Anatolia than that it had occurred. For the first time we present genomic results from an ancient Anatolian farmer, from Troy's proto-settlement Kumtepe, and it anchors the European neolithic genepool to Anatolia. Further, the late-neolithic individual from Kumtepe does not only contain the genetic element that is frequent in early European farmers, but also a component found mainly in modern populations from the Near and Middle East and Northern Africa, and to a much smaller degree, in some Neolithic European farmers. The scene presented by Kumtepe is compatible with geneflow into Europe from or through the neolithic core area in Anatolia. And it is likely that this occurred early, perhaps just after the neolithic core area had been established in southeastern Anatolia.
    Picked up by David: http://eurogenes.blogspot.co.uk/2015...abstracts.html
    Last edited by Jean M; 06-06-2015 at 02:20 PM.

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    Ninth ISABS Conference on Forensic and Anthropologic Genetics (22-26 June 2015) Abstract number: ABS-424-ISABS-2015

    FIRST GENOMIC DATA FROM ANCIENT HUMANS BELONGING TO THE STROKED POTTERY CULTURE
    E. M. Svensson et al.

    Significant changes took place in Central Europe between the culturally homogenous Linear Pottery Culture (LBK) and subsequent archaeological cultures. The cultures that followed LBK were more distinct and dispersed on a smaller regional scale. In the west the Rössen culture was formed, to the South East the Lengyel culture, and the Stroked Pottery Culture (STK) or replaced LBK in the East.

    We obtained authentic ancient DNA from six individuals, dated to 5360-5960 BP, from the site of Kolín in Bohemia, Czech Republic. The site is located on the Elbe river terrace, where four Neolithic rondels have been discovered together with human remains. The genetic data generated shows that the individuals carry different haplogroup lineages suggesting the mtDNA diversity was quite high in that population. These haplogroups have previously been found in farmers from an LBK setting. Genomic data show that STK individuals cluster with present-day Southern Europeans. These results are similar to what have previously been found when analyzing other Neolithic European farmers.
    Last edited by Jean M; 06-06-2015 at 02:20 PM.

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    Ninth ISABS Conference on Forensic and Anthropologic Genetics (22-26 June 2015) Abstract number: ABS-424-ISABS-2015

    GENOMIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NEOLITHIC AND MESOLITHIC HUNTER-GATHERERS IN SCANDINAVIA
    H. Malmström et al.

    Different origins of the late hunter-gatherers (HGs) of the Scandinavian Middle Neolithic (5300-4300 BP) Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) have been proposed. While many archaeologists advocate an ancestry in the preceding and partly contemporary farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) ancient genomic data show a strong genetic differentiation between these two groups. It has, in fact, been suggested from genome-wide capture data that PWC are the direct descendants of the Mesolithic HGs from Motala (Sweden) with no additional admixture from other populations. However, by reanalyzing published full genome sequence data from Ajvide (PWC), Gökhem (FBC) and Motala (Mesolithic HG) we gained higher resolution, and found previously unknown differences between Ajvide and Motala. First, Principal Component Analyses show that, even though Ajvide and Motala cluster together, Ajvide is closer to present-day European populations (and to early farmers). Second, D-tests show asymmetric relationships to other groups which would not be expected under a scenario of complete continuity. More specifically we show that i) Gökhem is closer to Ajvide than to Motala, ii) the Siberian Paleolithic HG MA1 is closer to Motala than to Ajvide, and iii) that the Central European Mesolithic HG Loschbour is closer to Ajvide than to Motala. These results indicate a more complex transition from Mesolithic to Neolithic HG societies in Scandinavia and the demographic implications will be discussed.
    Last edited by Jean M; 06-06-2015 at 02:20 PM.

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    Ninth ISABS Conference on Forensic and Anthropologic Genetics (22-26 June 2015) Abstract number: ABS-437-ISABS-2015

    WHAT THE GENOMES OF EIGHT EARLY IBERIAN FARMERS TELL US ABOUT THE PREHISTORY OF IBERIA AND THE REST OF EUROPE
    T. Günther et al.

    The consequences of the Neolithic transition in Europe – one of the most important cultural changes in human prehistory – is a subject of intense study. However, the consequence of this transition on prehistoric and modern-day people in Iberia, the westernmost frontier of the European continent, remains unresolved. Here we present the first genome-wide sequence data from eight human remains, dated to between 5,500 and 3,500 years before present (Chalcolithic and Bronze Age), excavated in the El Portalón cave at the Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. We show that these individuals emerged from the same ancestral gene pool as early farmers from other parts of Europe suggesting that migration was the dominant transfer-mode of farming practices throughout western Eurasia. Early farmers, including the El Portalón individuals, were found to have mixed with different local hunter-gatherers as they migrated to different parts of Europe and that the proportion of hunter-gatherer related admixture into farmers increased over the course of two millennia. Among all early farmers, the Chalcolithic El Portalón individuals show the greatest genetic affinity to Basques. These El Portalón genomes reveal important pieces of the demographic history of Iberia and Europe and advance our understanding of the relationship between hunter-gatherers and farmers, and how they relate to modern-day groups.

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    Ninth ISABS Conference on Forensic and Anthropologic Genetics (22-26 June 2015) Abstract number: ABS-422-ISABS-2015

    THE ANCIENT DNA STUDY OF A NORTH INDIAN HIMALAYAN POPULATION
    N. Rai, G. Chaubey, L. Singh, K. Thangaraj

    The high-altitude (5029 meters) Roopkund lake is situated in the Himalayan Mountains within the Northern Indian state of Uttaranchal. Here, 70 years ago, several hundred human skeletons were found, in the lake itself and in its vicinity. This discovery was puzzling as the reasons for which so many people would have travelled and found their end there remained elusive. This is the first study to address the origin of these individuals through genetic and biological analysis of the 82 skeletal remains. Using amelogenin marker, it was found that the majority of the individuals were males. In the same time, AMS dating of the bones revealed that the individuals had lived in the 8th century AD. To address the ancestry of this population, DNA was extracted from the bones of 80 individuals and the complete mitochondrial genome of each of them was sequenced; furthermore, for 25 of them, 200,000 autosomal markers were also genotyped. The comparative genetic analysis, which includes modern day data from both 700 individuals living in the vicinity of the Roopkund site and 22,000 individuals from across India, suggests that the 8th century Roopkund population comprised two groups of genetically distinct individuals. The majority showed genetic affinity with present day European and Middle Eastern populations, while the others displayed common haplogroups with the Austro-Asiatic population of the North Indian Himalayas.

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    Doesn't look like Neolithic people from Kumtepe, Turkey had ANE.

    A poster at Eurogenes had been told by someone with inside information about a paper that will soon be published with Ancient Armenian DNA that there's continuity between Bronze age and Modern Armenians.

    Remember, Samara Yamnaya is 50% Armenian-like, so if continuity in Northern West Asia went back another few thousand more years, that can confirm Yamnaya had ancestors specifically from the Caucasus.
    Last edited by Krefter; 06-06-2015 at 03:03 PM.

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    Quote from A MITOGENOMIC PHYLOGENY OF MACROHAPLOGROUP U AND SIGNALS FOR POPULATION EXPANSIONS IN EUROPE

    ". Evolutionary age of Slavic-specific subhaplogroups (such as U2e1b1, U3b1b, U5a1c1, U5a2a1b, U5b1a1) varied from 1.3 to 3.9 kya, according to the mutation rate for the entire mtDNA molecule. Subhaplogroups frequent among Eastern Europeans (U3a1a, U4a2a, U4a2g, U4d1, U5a1a2a) dated to 4.6-7.7 kya. Subhaplogroups found mostly among the Germanic-speaking populations (U5a1a1d, U5a1h, U5b2a1a1, U5b2a2, U5b2b4) were slightly older, with the age varying from 3.5 to 10.7 kya. The age of subhaplogroups, which are characteristic for both Slavic and Germanic populations (U2e1g, U2e2a1, U4a2b, U4c2, U5a1b1c, U5a2b1, U5b1e, U5b2a2b1), varied from 2.9 to 8.4 kya. "

    It makes sense that many(most?) U subclades in Central and Eastern Europe formed in the Neolithic. It's hard to find a U there that doesn't share a common ancestor with other Us there in the last 8,000 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krefter View Post
    A MITOGENOMIC PHYLOGENY OF MACROHAPLOGROUP U AND SIGNALS FOR POPULATION EXPANSIONS IN EUROPE
    I reported this paper on the other news thread, as it is not on ancient DNA. http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthre...ll=1#post87681

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