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Thread: Genetic Genealogy and Ancient DNA in the News

  1. #1001
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    http://www.nature.com/news/oldest-an...TWT_NatureNews

    Oldest ancient-human DNA details dawn of Neanderthals

    Sequence of 430,000-year-old DNA pushes back divergence of humans and Neanderthals

    Matthias Meyer has just published the results of what may be the world’s most wasteful genome-sequencing project. In decoding just 0.1% of the genome of the oldest DNA ever recovered from an ancient human, the molecular biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, threw out enough raw data to map the modern human genome dozens of times over.

    But the excess was necessary, because the DNA in the 430,000-year-old bones was degraded and contaminated. Meyer’s feat of recovery has revealed that the remains, from a cavern in northern Spain, represent early Neanderthals — and has pushed back estimates of the time at which the ancient predecessors of humans must have split from those of Neanderthals (M. Meyer et al. Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature17405 2016).
    Last edited by rozenfeld; 03-14-2016 at 04:27 PM.

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  3. #1002
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    Quote Originally Posted by rozenfeld View Post
    http://www.nature.com/news/oldest-an...TWT_NatureNews

    Oldest ancient-human DNA details dawn of Neanderthals

    Sequence of 430,000-year-old DNA pushes back divergence of humans and Neanderthals

    Matthias Meyer has just published the results of what may be the world’s most wasteful genome-sequencing project. In decoding just 0.1% of the genome of the oldest DNA ever recovered from an ancient human, the molecular biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, threw out enough raw data to map the modern human genome dozens of times over.

    But the excess was necessary, because the DNA in the 430,000-year-old bones was degraded and contaminated. Meyer’s feat of recovery has revealed that the remains, from a cavern in northern Spain, represent early Neanderthals — and has pushed back estimates of the time at which the ancient predecessors of humans must have split from those of Neanderthals (M. Meyer et al. Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature17405 2016).
    Pity it is behind a paywall, because this is a paper that will change the way we understand human evolution.

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  5. #1003
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    Quote Originally Posted by epoch View Post
    Pity it is behind a paywall, because this is a paper that will change the way we understand human evolution.
    I have access to academic papers. If you point me to the one that is behind a payment wall I can download it and email all of you guys the PDF. Just let me know which one it is you are referring to.

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  7. #1004
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    Quote Originally Posted by epoch View Post
    Pity it is behind a paywall, because this is a paper that will change the way we understand human evolution.
    How do you say "paywall" in Russian?:

    http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthre...neuroscientist


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    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2...a-archaeology/

    Tooth Plaque May Hold Clues About Ancient Life

    Archaeologists say dental calculus holds a trove of data to be studied.
    Picture of ancient teeth

    Fossilized plaque contains DNA from humans and bacteria. It might also hold clues about ancient civilizations.
    Photograph by Siphiwe Sibeko, Reuters
    By Anna Nowogrodzki

    PUBLISHED March 16, 2016

    A nuisance to dentists is now a boon for archaeologists. Researchers have successfully sequenced DNA from fossilized plaque on 700-year-old teeth.

    Solidified plaque—called calculus, tartar, or that chalky stuff the dentist scrapes off—contains a whopping 25 times more DNA than ancient tooth or bone. And, in a paper published Wednesday in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Christina Warinner and colleagues detail how they‘ve used plaque in research, a process that could catch on as a way to gather otherwise unobtainable information about the ancient world.

    Article itself:

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhan...02/ajpa.22960/

    Successful enrichment and recovery of whole mitochondrial genomes from ancient human dental calculus

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    http://phys.org/news/2016-03-science...eval-king.html

    Science sheds new light on the life and death of medieval king Erik
    March 16, 2016


    A joint research project headed by Uppsala University now reveals more of the health condition of Saint Erik, what he looked like, where he lived and what the circumstances of his death were. He was killed in 1160, in his tenth year of rule, by a Danish claimant to the throne. His remains have rested in a reliquary since 1257. On 23 April 2014, the reliquary was opened at a ceremony in Uppsala Cathedral. After this, researchers from several scientific disciplines set to work running tests on the remains in an attempt to learn more about the medieval king. Now, the first results of these examinations are made public.

    "The interdisciplinary research collaboration on the analysis of the skeletal remains of Saint Erik provides extensive information about his health condition (orthopaedists and radiologists), genealogy (aDNA analysis), diet (isotopanalys), and his death (forensic medicine)", says project leader Sabine Sten, professor of osteoarchaeology at Uppsala University.

    The opening of the reliquary also saw DNA samples taken. It is hoped that these will produce results that will shed new light on questions of genealogy. This analysis has not yet been completed, and is expected to take another year. The researchers can, however, reveal that the samples have yielded DNA information.

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    Frank J. Rhli et al., 2016, South African Journal of Science: Radiological and genetic analysis of a Late Iron Age mummy from the Tuli Block, Botswana
    Mummified human remains are valuable sources of information on past populations. Here we report on the radiological and molecular findings of a partially mummified individual found in northern Botswana. This desiccated mummy from the Tuli region is the first to have been reported from this region. The remains were those of an older male adult of African origin. He was interred in a tightly flexed position and wrapped in an animal skin. Computerised tomography (CT) scanning revealed that none of the internal organs was preserved. Multiple post-mortem alterations are seen, but apart from some degenerative changes of the lower vertebral column, the axial skeleton has remained intact. The advanced osteophytosis suggests an older age than what was previously estimated. The aDNA analysis confirms Sotho–Tswana and possibly Khoesan genetic relatedness, as could be expected from individuals from that region. These results represent one of the first CT scans of a mummified individual from southern Africa, and also the first successful aDNA extraction from such remains.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomenable View Post
    How do you say "paywall" in Russian?:
    O thanks a lot..

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    Not sure if this has been posted yet?

    http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/...ish/ar-BBqzg1K

    George

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    Fascinating, thanks for sharing. I had not read this. Despite the author's dismissal of the term celtic, the red shading on the map, showing modern population relationships, looks an awful lot like the modern distribution of L21. That I guess ties in with the 'pre-celtic' populations he's referring to. Also, does anyone know about the actual haplogroups of the remains?

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