Page 160 of 160 FirstFirst ... 60110150158159160
Results 1,591 to 1,600 of 1600

Thread: Genetic Genealogy and Ancient DNA in the News

  1. #1591
    Registered Users
    Posts
    582
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    C-M217
    mtDNA
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4425/8/10/262

    Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing of a Burial from a Romano–Christian Cemetery in the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt: Preliminary Indications

    J. Eldon Molto 1,* , Odile Loreille 2,†, Elizabeth K. Mallott 3, Ripan S. Malhi 4, Spence Fast 2, Jennifer Daniels-Higginbotham 2, Charla Marshall 2 and Ryan Parr 5
    1 Department of Anthropology, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
    2 Armed Forces Medical Examiner System—Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFMES/AFDIL), Dover, DE 19902, USA
    3 Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    4 Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 109 Davenport Hall, 607 S. Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, USA & Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
    5 Department of Anthropology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
    † Current address: FBI Laboratory, 2501 Investigation Parkway, Quantico, VA 22135, USA.
    *Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
    Academic Editor: Michael Hofreiter

    Received: 16 June 2017 / Revised: 15 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 6 October 2017
    (This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel and Neglected Areas of Ancient DNA Research)

    Abstract

    The curse of ancient Egyptian DNA was lifted by a recent study which sequenced the mitochondrial genomes (mtGenome) of 90 ancient Egyptians from the archaeological site of Abusir el-Meleq. Surprisingly, these ancient inhabitants were more closely related to those from the Near East than to contemporary Egyptians. It has been accepted that the timeless highway of the Nile River seeded Egypt with African genetic influence, well before pre-Dynastic times. Here we report on the successful recovery and analysis of the complete mtGenome from a burial recovered from a remote Romano–Christian cemetery, Kellis 2 (K2). K2 serviced the ancient municipality of Kellis, a village located in the Dakhleh Oasis in the southwest desert in Egypt. The data were obtained by high throughput sequencing (HTS) performed independently at two ancient DNA facilities (Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory, Dover, DE, USA and Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA). These efforts produced concordant haplotypes representing a U1a1a haplogroup lineage. This result indicates that Near Eastern maternal influence previously identified at Abusir el-Meleq was also present further south, in ancient Kellis during the Romano–Christian period.

    Keywords: Dakhleh Oasis; mitochondrial genome; Egypt; high throughput sequencing; U1a1a haplogroup; ancient DNA

    This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

  2. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (10-09-2017), blackflash16 (10-10-2017), ffoucart (10-09-2017), Genarh (10-10-2017), Hando (Yesterday), Helen (10-13-2017), Ignis90 (10-09-2017), Inigo Montoya (10-09-2017), Megalophias (10-12-2017), palamede (10-10-2017), vettor (10-12-2017)

  3. #1592
    Registered Users
    Posts
    582
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    C-M217
    mtDNA
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-pas100617.php

    Paleogenomic analysis sheds light on Easter Island mysteries

    http://www.cell.com/current-biology/...822(17)31194-6

    Genetic Ancestry of Rapanui before and after European Contact

    Lars Fehren-Schmitz, Catrine L. Jarman8, Kelly M. Harkins8, Manfred Kayser, Brian N. Popp, Pontus Skoglund8

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.09.029

    Highlights

    •We sequenced the first low-coverage genomes from pre-European-contact Rapanui
    •The individuals fall within Polynesian genetic diversity
    •We found no Native American admixture in pre- and post-European-contact individuals

    Summary

    The origins and lifeways of the inhabitants of Rapa Nui (Easter Island), a remote island in the southeast Pacific Ocean, have been debated for generations. Archaeological evidence substantiates the widely accepted view that the island was first settled by people of Polynesian origin, as late as 1200 CE [ 1–4 ]. What remains controversial, however, is the nature of events in the island’s population history prior to the first historic contact with Europeans in 1722 CE. Purported contact between Rapa Nui and South America is particularly contentious, and recent studies have reported genetic evidence for Native American admixture in present-day indigenous inhabitants of Rapa Nui [ 5–8 ]. Statistical modeling has suggested that this genetic contribution might have occurred prior to European contact [ 6 ]. Here we directly test the hypothesis that the Native American admixture of the current Rapa Nui population predates the arrival of Europeans with a paleogenomic analysis of five individual samples excavated from Ahu Nau Nau, Anakena, dating to pre- and post-European contact, respectively. Complete mitochondrial genomes and low-coverage autosomal genomes show that the analyzed individuals fall within the genetic diversity of present-day and ancient Polynesians, and we can reject the hypothesis that any of these individuals had substantial Native American ancestry. Our data thus suggest that the Native American ancestry in contemporary Easter Islanders was not present on the island prior to European contact and may thus be due to events in more recent history.





    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/...nd-neandertals

    Was this ancient person from China the offspring of modern humans and Neandertals?

    The article has a DOI which doesn't work: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.09.030

  4. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     blackflash16 (10-12-2017), lgmayka (10-14-2017), Megalophias (10-12-2017), Observer (10-12-2017), parasar (10-12-2017), RCO (10-12-2017), Saetro (10-12-2017), Varun R (10-12-2017)

  5. #1593
    Registered Users
    Posts
    4,762

    http://www.cell.com/current-biology/...822(17)31195-8
    Some error in the DOI


    "despite the geographical distance between them, the Tianyuan individual and GoyetQ116-1 may share ancestry from a population that did not contribute ancestry to the other Upper Paleolithic Eurasians analyzed to date...

    Eastern European hunter-gatherer Karelia [9], like the ancient Siberians and Western Eurasians, also show evidence of Asian gene flow."

    Last edited by parasar; 10-12-2017 at 05:26 PM.

  6. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to parasar For This Useful Post:

     ADW_1981 (10-12-2017), blackflash16 (10-12-2017), Hando (Yesterday), Helen (10-13-2017), Megalophias (10-12-2017), Observer (10-12-2017), Radboud (10-12-2017), rozenfeld (10-12-2017), Saetro (10-12-2017), Varun R (10-12-2017)

  7. #1594
    Registered Users
    Posts
    178
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Y-DNA
    R1b-Z326
    mtDNA
    HV

    Quote Originally Posted by parasar View Post
    http://www.cell.com/current-biology/...822(17)31195-8
    Some error in the DOI


    "despite the geographical distance between them, the Tianyuan individual and GoyetQ116-1 may share ancestry from a population that did not contribute ancestry to the other Upper Paleolithic Eurasians analyzed to date...

    Eastern European hunter-gatherer Karelia [9], like the ancient Siberians and Western Eurasians, also show evidence of Asian gene flow."

    Is the Y-haplogroup mentioned?

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Radboud For This Useful Post:

     Genarh (10-13-2017), Hando (Yesterday)

  9. #1595
    Registered Users
    Posts
    582
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    C-M217
    mtDNA
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...23338/abstract

    Open Access
    Creative Commons

    Ethnic derivation of the Ainu inferred from ancient mitochondrial DNA data

    Authors Noboru Adachi, Tsuneo Kakuda, Ryohei Takahashi, Hideaki Kanzawa-Kiriyama, Ken-ichi Shinoda

    First published: 11 October 2017Full publication history
    DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.23338 View/save citation

    Funding information Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Grant/Award Numbers: 25251043, 26440257, 15K01136, 16H01954, 17H02019, 17H03737; JSPS Core to Core Program (Advanced Research Networks) “Advanced Core Research Center for the History of Human Ecology in the North.”

    Abstract
    Objectives

    The Ainu, the indigenous people living on the northernmost island of Japan, Hokkaido, have long been a focus of anthropological interest because of their cultural, linguistic, and physical identity. A major problem with genetic studies on the Ainu is that the previously published data stemmed almost exclusively from only 51 modern-day individuals living in Biratori Town, central Hokkaido. To clarify the actual genetic characteristics of the Ainu, individuals who are less influenced by mainland Japanese, who started large-scale immigration into Hokkaido about 150 years ago, should be examined. Moreover, the samples should be collected from all over Hokkaido.
    Materials and methods

    Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups of 94 Ainu individuals from the Edo era were successfully determined by analyzing haplogroup-defining polymorphisms in the hypervariable and coding regions. Thereafter, their frequencies were compared to those of other populations.
    Results

    Our findings indicate that the Ainu still retain the matrilineage of the Hokkaido Jomon people. However, the Siberian influence on this population is far greater than previously recognized. Moreover, the influence of mainland Japanese is evident, especially in the southwestern part of Hokkaido that is adjacent to Honshu, the main island of Japan.
    Discussion

    Our results suggest that the Ainu were formed from the Hokkaido Jomon people, but subsequently underwent considerable admixture with adjacent populations. The present study strongly recommends revision of the widely accepted dual-structure model for the population history of the Japanese, in which the Ainu are assumed to be the direct descendants of the Jomon people.

  10. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (10-13-2017), dmana (10-13-2017), Govan (10-12-2017), Hando (Yesterday), Helen (10-13-2017), Jean M (10-12-2017), Observer (10-12-2017), palamede (10-13-2017), parasar (10-12-2017), Pribislav (10-13-2017), Varun R (10-12-2017)

  11. #1596
    Registered Users
    Posts
    1,014
    Sex
    Ethnicity
    Anglo
    Nationality
    Canadian

    Genetic Discontinuity between the Maritime Archaic and Beothuk Populations in Newfoundland, Canada

    Situated at the furthest northeastern edge of Canada,*the island of Newfoundland (approximately 110,000*km2) and Labrador (approximately 295,000*km2) today constitute a province characterized by abundant natural resources but low population density. Both landmasses were covered by the Laurentide ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (18,000 years before present [YBP]); after the glacier retreated, ice patches remained on the island until ca. 9,000 calibrated (cal) YBP [1]. Nevertheless, indigenous peoples, whose ancestors had trekked some 5,000*km from the west coast, arrived approximately 10,000 cal YBP in Labrador and ca. 6,000 cal YBP in Newfoundland [2, 3]. Differential features in material culture indicate at least three settlement episodes by distinct cultural groups, including the Maritime Archaic, Palaeoeskimo, and Beothuk. Newfoundland has remained home to indigenous peoples until present day with only one apparent hiatus (3,400–2,800 YBP). This record suggests abandonment, severe constriction, or local extinction followed by subsequent immigrations from single or multiple source populations, but the specific dynamics and the cultural and biological relationships, if any, among these successive peoples remain enigmatic [4]. By examining the mitochondrial genome diversity and isotopic ratios of 74 ancient remains in conjunction with the archaeological record, we have provided definitive evidence for the genetic discontinuity between the maternal lineages of these populations. This northeastern margin of North America appears to have been populated multiple times by distinct groups that did not share a recent common ancestry, but rather one much deeper in time at the entry point into the continent.

  12. The Following 14 Users Say Thank You to Megalophias For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (10-13-2017), Awale (10-12-2017), blackflash16 (10-12-2017), Genarh (10-13-2017), Gravetto-Danubian (10-12-2017), Helen (10-13-2017), kostoffj (10-12-2017), lgmayka (10-14-2017), palamede (10-13-2017), parasar (10-13-2017), Pribislav (10-13-2017), rozenfeld (10-12-2017), Saetro (10-13-2017), slievenamon (10-13-2017)

  13. #1597
    Registered Users
    Posts
    343
    Sex
    Location
    Canada
    Ethnicity
    Italian
    Y-DNA
    J-Y15222
    mtDNA
    U5a2b5

    Italy Italy Sicily Italy Two Sicilies Vatican Star of David
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/10/13/201483

    Contrasting maternal and paternal genetic variation of hunter-gatherer groups in Thailand

    Wibhu Kutanan, Jatupol Kampuansai, Piya Changmai, Pavel Flegontov, Roland Schroeder, Enrico Macholdt, Alexander Huebner, Daoroong Kangwanpong, Mark Stoneking

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/201483

    Abstract

    The Maniq and Mlabri are the only recorded nomadic hunter-gatherer groups in Thailand. Here, we sequenced complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA genomes and ~2.364 Mbp of non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) to learn more about the origins of these two enigmatic populations. Both groups exhibited low genetic diversity compared to other Thai populations, and contrasting patterns of mtDNA and NRY diversity: there was greater mtDNA diversity in the Maniq than in the Mlabri, while the converse was true for the NRY. We found basal uniparental lineages in the Maniq, namely mtDNA haplogroups M21a, R21 and M17a, and NRY haplogroup K. Overall, the Maniq are genetically similar to other negrito groups in Southeast Asia. By contrast, the Mlabri haplogroups (B5a1b1 for mtDNA and O1b1a1a1b and O1b1a1a1b1a1 for the NRY) are common lineages in Southeast Asian non-negrito groups, and overall the Mlabri are genetically similar to their linguistic relatives (Htin and Khmu) and other groups from northeastern Thailand. In agreement with previous studies of the Mlabri, our results indicate that the Malbri do not directly descend from the indigenous negritos. Instead, they likely have a recent origin (within the past 1,000 years) by an extreme founder event (involving just one maternal and two paternal lineages) from an agricultural group, most likely the Htin or a closely-related group.

  14. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Principe For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (10-13-2017), Megalophias (10-13-2017), Observer (10-14-2017), palamede (10-13-2017), parasar (10-13-2017), Pribislav (10-13-2017), RCO (10-13-2017), rozenfeld (10-13-2017)

  15. #1598
    Registered Users
    Posts
    582
    Sex
    Y-DNA
    C-M217
    mtDNA
    M8a

    Kyrgyzstan
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/10/13/203018

    Paleo-Eskimo genetic legacy across North America

    Pavel Flegontov, Nefize Ezgi Altinisik, Piya Changmai, Nadin Rohland, Swapan Mallick, Deborah A. Bolnick, Francesca Candilio, Olga Flegontova, Choongwon Jeong, Thomas K. Harper, Denise Keating, Douglas J. Kennett, Alexander M. Kim, Thiseas C. Lamnidis, Inigo Olalde, Jennifer Raff, Robert A. Sattler, Pontus Skoglund, Edward J. Vajda, Sergey Vasilyev, Elizaveta Veselovskaya, M. Geoffrey Hayes, Dennis H. O'Rourke, Ron Pinhasi, Johannes Krause, David Reich, Stephan Schiffels

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/203018

    Abstract

    Paleo-Eskimos were the first people to settle vast regions of the American Arctic around 5,000 years ago, and were subsequently joined and largely displaced around 1,000 years ago by ancestors of the present-day Inuit and Yupik. The genetic relationship between Paleo-Eskimos and Native American populations remains uncertain. We analyze ancient and present-day genome-wide data from the Americas and Siberia, including new data from Alaskan Inupiat and West Siberian populations, and the first genome-wide DNA from ancient Aleutian Islanders, ancient northern Athabaskans, and a 4,250-year-old individual of the Chukotkan Ust'-Belaya culture. Employing new methods based on rare allele and haplotype sharing as well as established methods based on allele frequency correlations, we show that Paleo-Eskimo ancestry is widespread among populations who speak Na-Dene and Eskimo-Aleut languages. Using phylogenetic modelling with allele frequency correlations and rare variation, we present a comprehensive model for the complex peopling of North America.

  16. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to rozenfeld For This Useful Post:

     Agamemnon (10-14-2017), bix (10-14-2017), lgmayka (10-14-2017), Megalophias (10-14-2017), Observer (10-14-2017), palamede (Yesterday), Pribislav (10-14-2017), Principe (10-14-2017), razyn (10-14-2017)

  17. #1599
    Registered Users
    Posts
    36
    Sex

    Studying folktale diffusion needs unbiased dataset

    [QUOTE ]Korotayev and Khaltourina showed statistical cor-relation between spatial distributions of mythologicalmotifs and genetic markers, considerably above the4,000 km proposed by Bortolini et al. (1). Such corre-lations allow us to reconstruct in detail the mythology [including folktales such as Aarne Thompson Uther catalog402(ATU402)] brought to the New World from South Siberia by three Paleolithic migration waves.

    Moreover, phylogenetic trees built on many versionsof the same folktale also show strong correlations withdocumented human migrations, and statistical meth-ods have already shown that ATU400 originated inEast Asia and was introduced twice into America. [/QUOTE]

    https://www.academia.edu/34759539/20...nas.1714884114

  18. #1600
    Registered Users
    Posts
    36
    Sex

    Studying folktale diffusion needs unbiased dataset

    Korotayev and Khaltourina showed statistical cor-relation between spatial distributions of mythological motifs and genetic markers, considerably above the4,000 km proposed by Bortolini et al. (1). Such corre-lations allow us to reconstruct in detail the mythology [including ATU402)] brought to the New World from South Siberia by three Paleolithic migration waves.

    Moreover, phylogenetic trees built on many versionsof the same folktale also show strong correlations withdocumented human migrations, and statistical meth-ods have already shown that ATU400 originated in East Asia and was introduced twice into America.
    https://www.academia.edu/34759539/20...nas.1714884114
    Last edited by Boreas; 10-14-2017 at 09:05 PM.

  19. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Boreas For This Useful Post:

     razyn (10-14-2017), rms2 (10-14-2017)

Page 160 of 160 FirstFirst ... 60110150158159160

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •