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Thread: wolf attack

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnHowellsTyrfro View Post
    Foxes are similar here in the UK but obviously not as powerful. Predators do what they evolved to do, they will kill as many as they can because it's pure instinct. Unfortunately we provide a source of food for them and they were here first.
    They also help to maintain a healthy eco system but human societies and large predators means problems for both. I hope our population doesn't expand to the point that there is no room for anything else.
    Foxes pray are mice, hares, birds - small mammals and birds. Foxes won't be able to kill sheep, cows, calves, horses unlike wolves. I don't think a large population of wolves will necessary maintain good eco system. There aren't many wild animals in forests anymore. So a larger population will turn wolves to livestock. In a region of Siberia authorities banned poison and traps on wolves, so the population increased and wolves needed more food. They started to kill livestock in villages. People complained to authorities and authorities allowed people to use traps again.

  2. #22
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    Courageous animal





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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volat View Post
    Foxes pray are mice, hares, birds - small mammals and birds. Foxes won't be able to kill sheep, cows, calves, horses unlike wolves. I don't think a large population of wolves will necessary maintain good eco system. There aren't many wild animals in forests anymore. So a larger population will turn wolves to livestock. In a region of Siberia authorities banned poison and traps on wolves, so the population increased and wolves needed more food. They started to kill livestock in villages. People complained to authorities and authorities allowed people to use traps again.
    Foxes certainly take lambs here in the UK - lots of them, as well as cats and poultry. I've lost many chickens to foxes myself.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnHowellsTyrfro View Post
    Foxes certainly take lambs here in the UK - lots of them, as well as cats and poultry. I've lost many chickens to foxes myself.
    Young sheep perhaps? If fully grown sheep, then likely it doesn't happen often. If foxes were responsible for as much damage as wolves, foxes would have faced fate of wolves across Europe.
    Last edited by Volat; Yesterday at 01:15 PM.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volat View Post
    Courageous animal




    It looked to me like, in the end, the wolf got spooked by the drone they were using to make that film. I'm sure he was tired, too.
     


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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rms2 View Post
    It looked to me like, in the end, the wolf got spooked by the drone they were using to make that film. I'm sure he was tired, too.
    It looks like it. Moose would likely outrun the wolf in the water with those long legs of his.

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  10. #27
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    there is no doubt in my mind, that the wolf finally spotting the drone hovering in his most vulnerable spot (his six) stopped the hunt...at around 4:30 mark he see's it, curls around in the water to get a better look and then goes directly to shore, spooked...good eyes rms

    second, that is an unusual attack in that it was a single wolf...that is not how they typically hunt and certainly not how they go after big prey...near the end, the drone showed 2 wolves on the railway track but I did not see 2 working the moose....did it seem like just one to you?

    makes me think it was probably a full grown but younger wolf...you know, like an older human male teenager...full of piss and vinegar and high hopes but kinda dopey for the most part

    moose are of course, monstrous size and while wolves can and do take them down, they almost always need a pack to do so
    ...I think most people dont realize just how huge and powerful they are until they run into one
    ....the first time I did, was when I had a summer job with our Federal Fire research group
    ...we were about 600 miles north of my city, way deep in the wilderness and on an old logging road
    ...I was driving the 1 ton 'jacked up high' crew cab pick up truck (the kind you have to jump up to just climb into) when I turned one corner to find a big bull moose about a meter away from us, just standing in the middle of the road looking at me
    ....its legs were so tall, that its huge body started right around the mid point of our wind shield
    ...we had to crank our necks a bit up just to look in its eyes and the antlers wrack seemed to be about the size of a small boat
    needles to say, we were all impressed to the point of awed at the size of the critter and they can be mean if you get near them in the wrong season

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