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Thread: New DNA Papers

  1. #871
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Chandler View Post
    Lots of R1b in the Syriac and Yazidi's!
    yes............it just proves what I have been saying for some time ...........the fertile crescent, northern iraq and the persian gulf where settled by only people moving south from the northern part of the Zargos mountains

    European - 99.2%............Central Asian - 0.8% .............Yfull - 1460BC
    Father's Mtdna .....T2b17.......1735 Porcellengo Veneto Italy
    Sons Mtdna .....K1a4 ...........1710 Carnic Alps

    My Path = ( K-M9+, TL-P326+, T-M184+, L490+, M70+, PF5664+, L131+, L446+, CTS933+, CTS54+, CTS8862+, Z19945+, A339+ )

    The main negatives = ( M193-, P322-, P327-, Pages11- , L25- , CTS1848- )

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  3. #872
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Chandler View Post
    Lots of R1b in the Syriac and Yazidi's!
    We've got a thread now going in the R1b General category for this.
    http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthre...-the-Near-East

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  5. #873
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    http://www.cell.com/ajhg/fulltext/S0002-9297(17)30394-4

    The Genetic Legacy of the Indian Ocean Slave Trade: Recent Admixture and Post-admixture Selection in the Makranis of Pakistan


    From the eighth century onward, the Indian Ocean was the scene of extensive trade of sub-Saharan African slaves via sea routes controlled by Muslim Arab and Swahili traders. Several populations in present-day Pakistan and India are thought to be the descendants of such slaves, yet their history of admixture and natural selection remains largely undefined. Here, we studied the genome-wide diversity of the African-descent Makranis, who reside on the Arabian Sea coast of Pakistan, as well that of four neighboring Pakistani populations, to investigate the genetic legacy, population dynamics, and tempo of the Indian Ocean slave trade. We show that the Makranis are the result of an admixture event between local Baluch tribes and Bantu-speaking populations from eastern or southeastern Africa; we dated this event to ∼300 years ago during the Omani Empire domination. Levels of parental relatedness, measured through runs of homozygosity, were found to be similar across Pakistani populations, suggesting that the Makranis rapidly adopted the traditional practice of endogamous marriages. Finally, we searched for signatures of post-admixture selection at traits evolving under positive selection, including skin color, lactase persistence, and resistance to malaria. We demonstrate that the African-specific Duffy-null blood group—believed to confer resistance against Plasmodium vivax infection—was recently introduced to Pakistan through the slave trade and evolved adaptively in this P. vivax malaria-endemic region. Our study reconstructs the genetic and adaptive history of a neglected episode of the African Diaspora and illustrates the impact of recent admixture on the diffusion of adaptive traits across human populations.

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  7. #874
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    Peng,M.-S., Song,J.-J. and Zhang,Y.-P., 'Mitochondrial Genomes Uncover the Maternal History of the Pamir Populations'

    The paper is not yet published but Ian Logan has posted the the mtDNA results that have already been published in GenBank. Ian writes:
    A very impressive set of 382 mtDNA sequences from the Pamiris mountain area has appeared on the GenBank database. The sequences are to accompany the paper (unpublished so far). The sequences appear to come from European, Eurasian and East Asian populations; so it will be interesting to see what the paper says.
    My estimate is that the primarily east/central/south Asian samples are about 37% (haplogroups A,B,C,D, F, G, M, N, R, U2b'c) and about 63% are more typically of west Eurasian origin (HV, H, J, K, I, W, T, U2e, U4, U5), of course recognizing that some of these "west Eurasian" haplogroups are commonly found in south and central Asia today, presumably with an Indo-European origin, or earlier. I'll post more detailed comments on some of the in interesting samples in the mtDNA forum.

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  9. #875
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    https://www.nature.com/articles/s10038-017-0370-2

    Mitogenomic diversity and differentiation of the Buryats

    Miroslava Derenko, Galina Denisova, Boris Malyarchuk, Irina Dambueva & Boris Bazarov

    Journal of Human Genetics (2017)
    doi:10.1038/s10038-017-0370-2

    Received: 10 May 2017
    Revised: 19 September 2017
    Accepted: 19 September 2017
    Published online: 09 November 2017

    Abstract

    In this paper we present a results of first comprehensive study of the complete mitogenomes in the Buryats with regard to their belonging to the main regional (eastern and western Buryats); tribal (Khori, Ekhirid, Bulagad, and Khongodor), and ethno-territorial (Aginsk, Alar, Balagansk, Barguzin, Ida, Khorinsk, Kuda, Selenga, Verkholensk, Olkhon, Tunka, and Shenehen Buryats) groups. The analysis of molecular variation performed using regional, tribal, and ethno-territorial divisions of the Buryats showed lack of genetic differentiation at all levels. Nonetheless, the complete mitogenome analysis revealed a very high level of genetic diversity in the Buryats which is the highest among Siberian populations and comparable to that in populations of eastern and western Asia. The AMOVA and MDS analyses results imply to a strong genetic similarity between the Buryats and eastern Asian populations of Chinese and Japanese, suggesting their origin on the basis of common maternal ancestry components. Several new Buryat-specific branches of haplogroup G (G2a2a, G2a1i, G2a5a) display signals of dispersals dating to 2.6–6.6 kya with a possible origin in eastern Asia, thus testifying Bronze Age and Neolithic arrival of ancestral eastern Asian component to the South Siberia region.

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  11. #876
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    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-15862-z

    Article | Open

    The genomic landscape of Nepalese Tibeto-Burmans reveals new insights into the recent peopling of Southern Himalayas

    Guido A. Gnecchi-Ruscone, Choongwon Jeong, Sara De Fanti, Stefania Sarno, Michela Trancucci, Davide Gentilini, Anna M. Di Blasio, Mingma G. Sherpa, Phurba T. Sherpa, Giorgio Marinelli, Marco Di Marcello, Luca Natali, Davide Peluzzi, Davide Pettener, Anna Di Rienzo, Donata Luiselli & Marco Sazzini

    doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15862-z

    Received: 13 January 2017
    Accepted: 24 October 2017
    Published online: 14 November 2017

    Abstract

    While much research attention has focused on demographic processes that enabled human diffusion on the Tibetan plateau, little is known about more recent colonization of Southern Himalayas. In particular, the history of migrations, admixture and/or isolation of populations speaking Tibeto-Burman languages, which is supposed to be quite complex and to have reshaped patterns of genetic variation on both sides of the Himalayan arc, remains only partially elucidated. We thus described the genomic landscape of previously unsurveyed Tibeto-Burman (i.e. Sherpa and Tamang) and Indo-Aryan communities from remote Nepalese valleys. Exploration of their genomic relationships with South/East Asian populations provided evidence for Tibetan admixture with low-altitude East Asians and for Sherpa isolation. We also showed that the other Southern Himalayan Tibeto-Burmans derived East Asian ancestry not from the Tibetan/Sherpa lineage, but from low-altitude ancestors who migrated from China plausibly across Northern India/Myanmar, having experienced extensive admixture that reshuffled the ancestral Tibeto-Burman gene pool. These findings improved the understanding of the impact of gene flow/drift on the evolution of high-altitude Himalayan peoples and shed light on migration events that drove colonization of the southern Himalayan slopes, as well as on the role played by different Tibeto-Burman groups in such a complex demographic scenario.

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  13. #877
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    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/earl...11/16/219808.1

    The Evolutionary Genomic Dynamics of Peruvians Before, During, and After the Inca Empire

    Daniel N Harris, Wei Song, Amol C Shetty, Kelly Levano, Omar Caceres, Carlos Padilla, Victor Borda, David Tarazona, Omar Trujillo, Cesar Sanchez, Michael D Kessler, Marco Galarza, Silvia Capristano, Harrison Montejo, Pedro O Flores-Villanueva, Eduardo Tarazona-Santos, Timothy D O'Connor, Heinner Guio

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/219808

    Abstract

    Native Americans from the Amazon, Andes, and coast regions of South America have a rich cultural heritage, but have been genetically understudied leading to gaps in our knowledge of their genomic architecture and demographic history. Here, we sequenced 150 high-coverage and genotyped 130 genomes from Native American and mestizo populations in Peru. A majority of our samples possess greater than 90% Native American ancestry and demographic modeling reveals, consistent with a rapid peopling model of the Americas, that most of Peru was peopled approximately 12,000 years ago. While the Native American populations possessed distinct ancestral divisions, the mestizo groups were admixtures of multiple Native American communities which occurred before and during the Inca Empire. The mestizo communities also show Spanish introgression only after Peruvian Independence. Thus, we present a detailed model of the evolutionary dynamics which impacted the genomes of modern day Peruvians.

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  15. #878
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCO View Post
    Forensic data and microvariant sequence characterization of 27 Y-STR loci analyzed in four Eastern African countries.
    Giuseppe Iacovacci, Eugenia D’Atanasio, Ornella Marini, Alfredo Coppa, Daniele Sellitto, Beniamino Trombetta, Andrea Berti, Fulvio
    Cruciani, , Forensic Science International: Genetics - Available online 29 December 2016
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2016.12.015

    Abstract
    By using the recently introduced 6-dye Yfiler® Plus multiplex, we analyzed 462 males
    belonging to 20 ethnic groups from four eastern African countries (Eritrea, Ethiopia,
    Djibouti and Kenya). Through a Y-STR sequence analysis, combined with 62 SNP-based
    haplogroup information, we were able to classify observed microvariant alleles at four YSTR
    loci as either monophyletic (DYF387S1 and DYS458) or recurrent (DYS449 and
    DYS627). We found evidence of non-allelic gene conversion among paralogous STRs of
    the two-copy locus DYF387S1. Twenty-two diallelic and triallelic patterns observed at 13
    different loci were found to be significantly over-represented (p < 10-6) among profiles
    obtained from cell lines compared to those from blood and saliva. Most of the
    diallelic/triallelic patterns from cell lines involved recurrent mutations at rapidly mutating
    loci (RM Y-STRs) included in the multiplex (p < 10-2). At haplotype level, intra-population
    diversity indices were found to be among the lowest so far reported for the Yfiler® Plus,
    while statistically significant differences among countries and ethnic groups were detected
    when considering haplotype frequencies alone (FST) or by using molecular distances
    among haplotypes (ST). The strong population subdivision observed is probably the
    consequence of the patrilineal social organization of most eastern African ethnic groups,
    and suggests caution in the use of country-based haplotype frequency distributions for
    forensic inferences in this region

    Attachment 13463

    Further breakdown for those who can't access it.
    S.jpg

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  17. #879
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    e-m34 in ethiopia cool
    thanks for sharing the table
    very rare in somalia but big in ethiopia
    eurogenes k13
    Lebanese_Muslim + Lebanese_Muslim + Serbian + Tuscan @ 1.235682
    do

    AJ + RO + Samaritan + South_Italian_&_Sicilian @ 2.93306
    geno 2 next genration after fixed rounding error : i am 99% human + 1% archaic caveman
    dodecad k7b
    1 Druze + Lithuanian + S_Italian_Sicilian + Samaritians @ 0.000000 Hidden Content Hidden Content

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  19. #880
    Quote Originally Posted by rozenfeld View Post
    Mitogenomic diversity and differentiation of the Buryats

    Miroslava Derenko, Galina Denisova, Boris Malyarchuk, Irina Dambueva & Boris Bazarov
    Journal of Human Genetics (2017)
    doi:10.1038/s10038-017-0370-2

    <snip>.
    unfortunately hidden behind an pay wall.

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