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Thread: Pashto Songs

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapporo View Post
    Well, no doubt Pashto isn't close enough to actually be even semi intelligible with Hindi/Urdu, there are obviously some similarities as Iranic and Indo-Aryan languages are both part of the Indo-Iranian subbranch of Indo-European languages. I'm not a linguist but Pashto definitely sounds much more familiar to Indo-Aryan languages than any of the other Iranic languages (Farsi, Balochi, Kurdish, Ossetian, Luri, etc.). That may just be an artifact of geography and cultural exchange. Not 100% sure.

    http://people.ku.edu/~mmth/Some_Indi..._in_Pashto.pdf

    http://www.britannica.com/topic/Pashto-language

    "Extensive borrowing has caused Pashto to share many features of the Indo-Aryan group of the Indo-European languages as well."
    The borrowing is true however it depends who speaks it as well as where is it spoken I checked the britannica site:
    Road in Pashto is not Sadak its laar, sweet is khozz and not Peda, Window is Panjra also Kharkey, Male buffalo is Sanda not Snar. Not all Pashto speakers will use the Pashto words, I mentioned. Those are the words used by speakers of Kandahari(Southern and Western) and Wardaki(Central and some eastern) Pashto in Afghanistan.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapporo View Post
    Well, no doubt Pashto isn't close enough to actually be even semi intelligible with Hindi/Urdu, there are obviously some similarities as Iranic and Indo-Aryan languages are both part of the Indo-Iranian subbranch of Indo-European languages. I'm not a linguist but Pashto definitely sounds much more familiar to Indo-Aryan languages than any of the other Iranic languages (Farsi, Balochi, Kurdish, Ossetian, Luri, etc.). That may just be an artifact of geography and cultural exchange. Not 100% sure.

    http://people.ku.edu/~mmth/Some_Indi..._in_Pashto.pdf

    http://www.britannica.com/topic/Pashto-language

    "Extensive borrowing has caused Pashto to share many features of the Indo-Aryan group of the Indo-European languages as well."
    The increased familiarity to speakers of Indo-Aryan languages is also due to the fact that Pashto has preserved many "archaic" Iranian features. Basically, archaic features shared between older Iranian and Indo-Aryan. I've read that (in this respect) Pashto is one of the most conservative Iranian languages.

    Also, for what it's worth, Balochi (as spoken in Pakistan) has a far more Indo-Aryan "feel" than Pashto. If I didn't know any better, I would more quickly associate the common Balochi dialect of Pakistan with the Sindhi language, even though phylogenetically it's closest to Kurdish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zahra View Post
    The borrowing is true however it depends who speaks it as well as where is it spoken I checked the britannica site:
    Road in Pashto is not Sadak its laar, sweet is khozz and not Peda, Window is Panjra also Kharkey, Male buffalo is Sanda not Snar. Not all Pashto speakers will use the Pashto words, I mentioned. Those are the words used by speakers of Kandahari(Southern and Western) and Wardaki(Central and some eastern) Pashto in Afghanistan.
    On the contrary, these Pashto words you've listed are universal, all Pashtuns use these words. Of course, one does have the "hard/soft" difference, so khoz would be khog for many Pashtuns.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zahra View Post
    The borrowing is true however it depends who speaks it as well as where is it spoken I checked the britannica site:
    Road in Pashto is not Sadak its laar, sweet is khozz and not Peda, Window is Panjra also Kharkey, Male buffalo is Sanda not Snar. Not all Pashto speakers will use the Pashto words, I mentioned. Those are the words used by speakers of Kandahari(Southern and Western) and Wardaki(Central and some eastern) Pashto in Afghanistan.
    In the first comparison I linked, Henderson from UW-Madison also notes that Pashto does have similarity to Indo-Aryan languages in its grammatical construction. Although, he notes a lot of the differences that Pashto has with Farsi and other Iranic languages is simply due to it retaining more similarity to Avestan/Old Iranian languages, which was lost in Farsi (such as gender marking). I definitely think most of the resemblances that Pashto has to Indo-Aryan languages are superficial and the rest are simply because of the borrowing from Northwestern Indo-Aryan languages but point is there is some similarity albeit not huge. Part of it is due to geography/cultural exchange and the other because Pashto is one of the most conservative Iranian languages that retains much from Old Iranian languages that were quite similar to old Indo-Aryan languages.
    Last edited by Sapporo; 06-26-2015 at 08:24 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sein View Post
    The increased familiarity to speakers of Indo-Aryan languages is also due to the fact that Pashto has preserved many "archaic" Iranian features. Basically, archaic features shared between older Iranian and Indo-Aryan. I've read that (in this respect) Pashto is one of the most conservative Iranian languages.

    Also, for what it's worth, Balochi (as spoken in Pakistan) has a far more Indo-Aryan "feel" than Pashto. If I didn't know any better, I would more quickly associate the common Balochi dialect of Pakistan with the Sindhi language, even though phylogenetically it's closest to Kurdish.
    I haven't listened to Balochi so was only basing my comparison to the Iranian languages I have heard (Farsi, Pashto and Kurdish). Regarding Balochi having more of an Indo-Aryan feel, that is probably the case though. However, is that not possibly do to linguistic exchange between Sindh and Balochistan? Otherwise, Balochi is a Northwestern Iranian language.
    Last edited by Sapporo; 06-26-2015 at 08:27 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapporo View Post
    I haven't listened to Balochi so was only based my comparison to the Iranian languages I have heard (Farsi, Pashto and Kurdish). Regarding Balochi having more of an Indo-Aryan feel, that is probably the case though. However, is that not possibly do to linguistic exchange between Sindh and Balochistan? Otherwise, Balochi is a Northwestern Iranian language.
    I think so, it probably boils down to the intense cultural interaction between Balochistan and Sindh.

    A side note, but many people in Peshawar speak a very mixed variant of Pashto, with heavy dosages of Urdu, and even English. Some people in that city can't even count in Pashto (), but those individuals tend to be of Hindkowan background.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapporo View Post
    Well, no doubt Pashto isn't close enough to actually be even semi intelligible with Hindi/Urdu, there are obviously some similarities as Iranic and Indo-Aryan languages are both part of the Indo-Iranian subbranch of Indo-European languages. I'm not a linguist but Pashto definitely sounds much more familiar to Indo-Aryan languages than any of the other Iranic languages (Farsi, Balochi, Kurdish, Ossetian, Luri, etc.). That may just be an artifact of geography and cultural exchange. Not 100% sure.

    http://people.ku.edu/~mmth/Some_Indi..._in_Pashto.pdf

    http://www.britannica.com/topic/Pashto-language

    "Extensive borrowing has caused Pashto to share many features of the Indo-Aryan group of the Indo-European languages as well."
    Being familiar with some of the languages mentioned, I believe from a distance Pashto sounds most similar to Sorani Kurdi. The following Kurdi drama illustrates this:


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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurd View Post
    Being familiar with some of the languages mentioned, I believe from a distance Pashto sounds most similar to Sorani Kurdi. The following Kurdi drama illustrates this:

    Very interesting, I do hear a strong resemblance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sein View Post
    Very interesting, I do hear a strong resemblance.
    What is even more interesting, and somewhat mysterious is that both Pashtu and Kurdi have Farsi overlapping words, but Kurdi has words in common with Pashtu not found in Farsi in spite of not bordering Pashtun areas. I can't see any other explanation than an ancestral connection between the two. Perhaps it is the Kurd tribes that have Scythian origin, or some other Kurd tribes that migrated from Central Asia
    Last edited by Kurd; 06-27-2015 at 03:39 AM.

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    A very nice ghazal by Haroon Bacha. I like the logari beat half way through the song


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