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Thread: First Mesolithic ancient Y-DNA is I*, I2 and I2a1b*

  1. #1
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    First Mesolithic ancient Y-DNA is I*, I2 and I2a1b*

    Lazaridis, I. et al. (2013), Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for Europeans, pre-print online 23 December 2013. http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2013/12/23/001552

    Analysis of ancient DNA can reveal historical events that are difficult to discern through study of present-day individuals. To investigate European population history around the time of the agricultural transition, we sequenced complete genomes from a ~7,500 year old early farmer from the Linearbandkeramik (LBK) culture from Stuttgart in Germany and an ~8,000 year old hunter-gatherer from the Loschbour rock shelter in Luxembourg. We also generated data from seven ~8,000 year old hunter-gatherers from Motala in Sweden. We compared these genomes and published ancient DNA to new data from 2,196 samples from 185 diverse populations to show that at least three ancestral groups contributed to present-day Europeans. The first are Ancient North Eurasians (ANE), who are more closely related to Upper Paleolithic Siberians than to any present-day population. The second are West European Hunter-Gatherers (WHG), related to the Loschbour individual, who contributed to all Europeans but not to Near Easterners. The third are Early European Farmers (EEF), related to the Stuttgart individual, who were mainly of Near Eastern origin but also harbored WHG-related ancestry. We model the deep relationships of these populations and show that about ~44% of the ancestry of EEF derived from a basal Eurasian lineage that split prior to the separation of other non-Africans.
    Loschbour, Heffingen [LSB 1] (6220-5990 BC): dark hair, 50% probability of blue eyes. Y-DNA I2a1b* (L178+, M423+, P37.2+, L460+, M438+, L68+, P38+, M170+, M359.2-, L161.1-, L621-)

    Motola males c. 6000 BC:

    Motola 2: I* (P38+ , U179+ , L41+, M253-, L37-)
    Motola 3: I2 (L68+, M258+, U179+, L181-, L417-)
    Motola 9: I* (P38+, P40-)
    Motola 12: I2a1b* (L178+, M423+, P37.2+, L460+, L68+, M170+, M258+, U179+, M359.2-, L621-)

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    Perhaps this also supports a later development of I1, rather than an earlier one?
    Y-DNA: I1* (Ware, Hertfordshire)
    MT-DNA: U5a1b4 (Boughton Aluph, Kent)
    Father's MT-DNA: J1c8 (Wolverhampton, Staffordshire)
    Grandfather's MT-DNA: H1b (Littlehampton, Sussex)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anglecynn View Post
    Perhaps this also supports a later development of I1, rather than an earlier one?
    The lineage that led to I1 is as old as that which led to I2. I1 has a much later expansion than I2.

    The difference seems to be that the I1 lineage was not an early adopter of farming. So it maintained itself at replacement level, as hunter-gatherers do. It accumulated a lot of mutations (a sign of age), but no subclades. That picture is of only one son surviving (or having surviving male offspring) from each father. So along the route that led to I1 are many generations that we would label I*, because we have no living samples between I* and I1. They may turn up in ancient DNA.

    I just updated my page on haplogroup I to take into account the new ancient DNA results. http://www.ancestraljourneys.org/haplogroupi.shtml

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    The aDNA data seems to conclusively supports one of the common views in the genetic genealogy community, where Y-DNA haplogroup I is a quintessentially European lineage. Its' presence all across prehistoric sites from Spain to Sweden is quite telling.

    Looks like this might be the case where frequency is indicative of the general zone of development since prehistoric times, which is in direct contrast to Y-DNA R1b.

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    Yes, but we can find some basal types of haplogroup I continuously living in the Northern Middle East and soon we are going to know their whole sequence. I think some basal types of I and J remained close to their IJ original cradle in some regions of Northern Iran and East Anatolia.

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  11. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by RCO View Post
    Yes, but we can find some basal types of haplogroup I continuously living in the Northern Middle East and soon we are going to know their whole sequence. I think some basal types of I and J remained close to their IJ original cradle in some regions of Northern Iran and East Anatolia.
    Which ones are those? Almost all Middle Eastern I is I2c and I2a-Din (and there is even no need to consider the possibility of Middle Eastern I1 as living there continuously). Both of these could have (and likely) did arrive with Indo-European speaking nomads from north of the Black Sea or Indo-European migrations from the Balkans (also later empires that spanned Anatolia and the Balkans are a possibility as is the Silk Road). Both have their center of diversity and frequency in Europe. Even if some I is found in Asia that is older it is likely from the Mesolithic corridor that spanned from Iberia to Siberia or from some sort of migration from the North Caspian imo.

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    You can find small pockets of haplogroup I in the last paper of Julie di Cristofaro: Afghan Hindu Kush: Where Eurasian Sub-Continent Gene Flows Converge. Basal types of J and I from Iran and Central Asia can have a very interesting history and they can have complete new sequences of whole Y-DNA, completely different from the Western European cases.

    http://www.plosone.org/article/fetch...e.0076748.s007

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    This is big news. Thanks, Jean. I updated my little Google map to include it.

    http://goo.gl/maps/Dh90

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  17. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by RCO View Post
    You can find small pockets of haplogroup I in the last paper of Julie di Cristofaro: Afghan Hindu Kush: Where Eurasian Sub-Continent Gene Flows Converge. Basal types of J and I from Iran and Central Asia can have a very interesting history and they can have complete new sequences of whole Y-DNA, completely different from the Western European cases.

    http://www.plosone.org/article/fetch...e.0076748.s007
    Is this any different from the old studies which showed Central Asian I being I2a2? Or contradict anything I said about the majority of West Asian I being I2a-DIN and I2c with a small minority of I1. All four of these lineages have their center of diversity and frequency in Europe. Does this paper find anything that disputes that?

    There isn't much I in Asia and whatever there is can be explained by European admixture. Just because some of these lineages have STR values not typical of Europe doesn't mean they originated in Asia and have been living there for thousands of years. The same logic could be applied to the small amounts of R1a-M458 in the North Caucasus or R1b-L51 in Armenians.

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    You need the phylogenetic applications of whole Y-chromosome sequences to understand the history of I and J in places like Northern Iran and Eastern Anatolia. R1a-M458 and R1b-L51 have far less new SNPs than I and J basal cases. Count the new SNPs ! I had 185 new FGC SNPs in my J1b test. R1a-M458 and R1b-L51 will not have a big number of new SNPs because they are not old enough to compare with I and J basal types.

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