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Thread: AncestryDNA results from Asia, the Pacific & Native Americans

  1. #11
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    Are you able to help me figure out what I'm looking for to finding out some information regarding results you came up with

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sktibo View Post
    Attachment 18584

    My father's result. Metis descent. I always wondered what was up with that Central Asia percentage he got but your collection of results appears to explain it: Canada (mb) must be Manitoba, where his Native American ancestry came from. Cree, Salteaux, and Assiniboine.

    Mystery solved! thank you Don Felipe!

    Very nice! Glad this overview could be useful! Yes i would combine those two regions as both being part of his Metis heritage. That Canadian result was indeed for someone from Manitoba, about whom i did not have any further details.

    From what i have seen many people of partial Native American descent tend to score additional "Asia Central" scores. That is also including Hispanics even when Latin American Natives do not seem to have any detectable socalled Central Asian affinities yet compared with Natives from the US and especially Canada. The shared Siberian origins must be at the roots of this reporting but somehow for mixed people it might act up more strongly.

    Quote Originally Posted by zeerichardson View Post
    I am trying to figure out how this all works. Can you please help me, so i have my ancestry results but how are you taking the results and averaging them out to figure out other places your ancestors may of come from?
    I'm not sure if i understand your question correctly, is it about my survey specifically or is it about how to interpret your own results?
    In case it's the latter read this:

    AncestryDNA Ethnicity Estimate Help and Tips
    Hidden Content
    Exploring the Ethnic Origins of the Afro-Diaspora

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Don Felipe For This Useful Post:

     sktibo (09-06-2017)

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Felipe View Post
    Very nice! Glad this overview could be useful! Yes i would combine those two regions as both being part of his Metis heritage. That Canadian result was indeed for someone from Manitoba, about whom i did not have any further details.

    From what i have seen many people of partial Native American descent tend to score additional "Asia Central" scores. That is also including Hispanics even when Latin American Natives do not seem to have any detectable socalled Central Asian affinities yet compared with Natives from the US and especially Canada. The shared Siberian origins must be at the roots of this reporting but somehow for mixed people it might act up more strongly.
    Thank you! I'm sorry I can't provide a "genetically true" Metis sample for you here, as my father is as far back as I am able to go, and his mother was Scottish/English/Welsh. His father's mother was also from the British Isles, His father's father's mother was the last person in his line who would have identified as Metis, (prior to our family today identifying as Metis with the cultural revival going on) his father's father's father being French Canadian. I suppose my father is about an eighth, genetically speaking. If his result is useful to you I would be happy to share, let me know though if you do want it so I can obtain his full permission if you would like.
    Last edited by sktibo; 09-06-2017 at 10:41 PM.
    Paper trail ancestry to the best of my knowledge:
    English 28.12%, German 18.75%, Scottish 17.96%, Irish (mostly lowland Scottish origin) 12.5%, French 8.2%, Eastern European 6.25%, Welsh 3.125%, Native American 1.95%, and Colonial American, 3.125%, which cannot be determined with complete certainty: there is Dutch (at least 1.36%) and some English. The rest could include Spanish, Norwegian, German, French, and Native American, but these percentages would be minuscule.

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     Don Felipe (09-07-2017)

  6. #14
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    Not sure, what is the purpose of this exercise. I would suggest even include some of the Gedmatch calculator results as Ancestry DNA ancestry estimates do not tell you much

  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jortita View Post
    Not sure, what is the purpose of this exercise.
    It's to determine how predictive each separate region might be judging by the scores reported for "natives". Like i mentioned in the OP i found that the predictive accuracy is variable and contextdependent.

    Quote Originally Posted by jortita View Post
    Ancestry DNA ancestry estimates do not tell you much
    I have to disagree. Instead of hasty dismissal i would argue for finding informational value despite imperfections. I understand that in individual cases, perhaps also yours, AncestryDNA might appear to get it wrong. Especially when you fixate too much on the regional labeling. However for other people the results will be much more in line with their known background. As i said this depends on the predictive accuracy for each separate region.

    Despite inherent limitations I do believe that AncestryDNA can provide you with a great deal of informational value however you do need to be able to make correct interpretations. Being aware of these group averages (even when based on minimal sample size) might give you an idea how to judge your own results.
    Last edited by Don Felipe; 09-07-2017 at 12:25 PM.
    Hidden Content
    Exploring the Ethnic Origins of the Afro-Diaspora

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Don Felipe For This Useful Post:

     jortita (09-08-2017), sktibo (09-07-2017), XooR (09-07-2017)

  9. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Felipe View Post
    It's to determine how predictive each separate region might be judging by the scores reported for "natives". Like i mentioned in the OP i found that the predictive accuracy is variable and contextdependent.



    I have to disagree. Instead of hasty dismissal i would argue for finding informational value despite imperfections. I understand that in individual cases, perhaps also yours, AncestryDNA might appear to get it wrong. Especially when you fixate too much on the regional labeling. However for other people the results will be much more in line with their known background. As i said this depends on the predictive accuracy for each separate region.

    Despite inherent limitations I do believe that AncestryDNA can provide you with a great deal of informational value however you do need to be able to make correct interpretations. Being aware of these group averages (even when based on minimal sample size) might give you an idea how to judge your own results.
    I think a lot of people are having a hard time understanding that the results are not going to most likely correlate with your immediate paper trail. Rather, the results will shed light on the ancient and historical influences of those people in your paper trail.

    Ancestry does state on their website that these results are thousands of years ago. I guess many people are ignoring that fact. I find the results very helpful in context because I already know my immediate paper trail.

    Since History is an important hobby of mine the results make even more sense when you analyze historical migrations and empires. For the average layman with little historical background I could see how the results could be confusing. Ancestry does try to help out by giving historical info for each region if people bother to read it.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to mwauthy For This Useful Post:

     Don Felipe (09-07-2017)

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