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rz1706
11-07-2016, 05:38 PM
New paper about Y chromosome by Calafell, Larmuseau, 05 November 2016

The Y chromosome as the most popular marker in genetic genealogy benefits interdisciplinary research (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00439-016-1740-0)

Abstract
The Y chromosome is currently by far the most popular marker in genetic genealogy that combines genetic data and family history. This popularity is based on its haploid character and its close association with the patrilineage and paternal inherited surname. Other markers have not been found (yet) to overrule this status due to the low sensitivity and precision of autosomal DNA for genetic genealogical applications, given the vagaries of recombination, and the lower capacities of mitochondrial DNA combined with an in general much lower interest in maternal lineages. The current knowledge about the Y chromosome and the availability of markers with divergent mutation rates make it possible to answer questions on relatedness levels which differ in time depth; from the individual and familial level to the surnames, clan and population level. The use of the Y chromosome in genetic genealogy has led to applications in several well-established research disciplines; namely in, e.g., family history, demography, anthropology, forensic sciences, population genetics and sex chromosome evolution. The information obtained from analysing this chromosome is not only interesting for academic scientists but also for the huge and lively community of amateur genealogists and citizen-scientists, fascinated in analysing their own genealogy or surname. This popularity, however, has also some drawbacks, mainly for privacy reasons related to the DNA donor, his close family and far-related namesakes. In this review paper we argue why Y-chromosomal analysis and its genetic genealogical applications will still perform an important role in future interdisciplinary research.

johen
11-07-2016, 06:02 PM
New study about Y chromosome by Calafell, Larmuseau, 05 November 2016

The Y chromosome as the most popular marker in genetic genealogy benefits interdisciplinary research (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00439-016-1740-0)

[I]Abstract
The Y chromosome is currently by far the most popular marker in genetic genealogy that combines genetic data and family history. This popularity is based on its haploid character and its close association with the patrilineage and paternal inherited [B]surname.

Just curiosity. when is the first time to use surname in European history?
Jesus, Cesar is not surname.

R.Rocca
11-07-2016, 06:42 PM
Just curiosity. when is the first time to use surname in European history?
Jesus, Cesar is not surname.

I read many years ago that in Europe, it started during the late Middle Ages in Venice. No data to back it up though.

Saetro
11-07-2016, 06:53 PM
Just curiosity. when is the first time to use surname in European history?
Jesus, Cesar is not surname.

No, his surname was Julius.
His first name was Gaius.
Caesar was a title.
The Romans had these family names back towards the founding of Rome.
According to my Latin teachers, long ago.

Jean M
11-07-2016, 06:58 PM
Just curiosity. when is the first time to use surname in European history?
Jesus, Cesar is not surname.

If we ignore the family names used by Roman citizens, then the Irish had some of the earliest hereditary surnames, with some appearing in the early 10th century AD, though most were created during the 11th and 12th centuries.: http://www.ancestraljourneys.org/irishsurnames.shtml

Romilius
11-07-2016, 07:24 PM
If we ignore the family names used by Roman citizens, then the Irish had some of the earliest hereditary surnames, with some appearing in the early 10th century AD, though most were created during the 11th and 12th centuries.: http://www.ancestraljourneys.org/irishsurnames.shtml

Could also the Swiss have them? I know of census in XI century in many Swiss towns... so it is possible they had family names in order to distinct people with the same names and patronimics.

In my area of origin in Italy, some families have a surname from the X century... they are local families from civic nobility, not feudal lords.

ArmandoR1b
11-07-2016, 11:19 PM
I am interested in my Y-DNA SNPs which I inherited from my ancestors in the direct paternal line. My Y-DNA genetic tree has been created by them and once enough people get Y-DNA NGS or WGS testing I will know my Y-DNA SNPs in chronological order between about 3900 years ago and now. It is nice to have a Y-DNA match from hundreds of years ago with the same surname too though.

rms2
11-08-2016, 01:14 AM
Y-dna has been my special interest since I got started in genetic genealogy back in April of 2006. Finding my y-dna immigrant ancestor is the Holy Grail of my genetic genealogy quest, but I would be thrilled with even another generation or two back.

vettor
11-08-2016, 04:02 AM
I read many years ago that in Europe, it started during the late Middle Ages in Venice. No data to back it up though.

was it this

http://www.venarbol.net/en/chronique-familiale/qui-taient-mes-anctres/les-patronymes-2

or this ....you need to translate

http://venetoedintorni.it/cognomi-veneti/informazioni-sui-cognomi.php

J Man
11-08-2016, 11:56 AM
For me overall my Y-DNA line is definitely the most important lineage. It is what makes me a man/male after all. That plus I have passed it on to my son so that is also pretty cool. Recently I have also discovered a new paternal line relative that has the same surname and ancestry from the same town in Calabria that my Y line ancestor came from. So this again reinforces my interest in my Y-DNA line even more. :D

R.Rocca
11-08-2016, 12:00 PM
was it this

http://www.venarbol.net/en/chronique-familiale/qui-taient-mes-anctres/les-patronymes-2

or this ....you need to translate

http://venetoedintorni.it/cognomi-veneti/informazioni-sui-cognomi.php

Venice is referenced in hundreds of internet sites as the modern origin of surname use, but I have yet to see a reference as to why/how.

rms2
11-08-2016, 12:03 PM
Venice is referenced in hundreds of internet sites as the modern origin of surname use, but I have yet to see a reference as to why/how.

Given the commercial prominence of Venice for so long, I would guess it probably had something to do with keeping track of people in ledgers, balance sheets, wills, etc. Just a guess though.

Dubhthach
11-08-2016, 12:57 PM
Venice is referenced in hundreds of internet sites as the modern origin of surname use, but I have yet to see a reference as to why/how.

As Jean mentions the oldest strata of Irish surnames (which are still in use today) date to the 10th century. For example Ó Néill (Ua Néill) becomes a permanent surname in the late 10th century, taken by the descendants of Níall Glúndubh (d. 919AD) who was killed fighting the Dublin Vikings. The oldest Irish surname is probably Cleary (Ó Cléirigh)

R.Rocca
11-08-2016, 01:37 PM
As Jean mentions the oldest strata of Irish surnames (which are still in use today) date to the 10th century. For example Ó Néill (Ua Néill) becomes a permanent surname in the late 10th century, taken by the descendants of Níall Glúndubh (d. 919AD) who was killed fighting the Dublin Vikings. The oldest Irish surname is probably Cleary (Ó Cléirigh)

It looks like the surnames Catarodi, Lutriani and Catapalumbo were being used in Benevento in 703 AD. By 819 AD, wealthy Venetian families used the surnames Badoer, Gradenigo and Contarini. After about 1000, the use really started to take off.

Source: I cognomi degli Italiani: Una storia lunga 1000 anni
https://books.google.com/books?id=4MOODAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

parasar
11-08-2016, 02:04 PM
For India the problem was often other way around, the gotra (paternal lineage) is sometimes mentioned without a first name making it difficult to disentangle the chronology.
https://books.google.com/books?id=2BRjkE385ScC&pg=PA211

Dubhthach
11-08-2016, 02:34 PM
It looks like the surnames Catarodi, Lutriani and Catapalumbo were being used in Benevento in 703 AD. By 819 AD, wealthy Venetian families used the surnames Badoer, Gradenigo and Contarini. After about 1000, the use really started to take off.

Source: I cognomi degli Italiani: Una storia lunga 1000 anni
https://books.google.com/books?id=4MOODAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

so these surnames are still in use today?

Dubhthach
11-08-2016, 02:50 PM
Just as an aside the paper posted by the Original Poster can be read on Sci-Hub

leonardo
11-08-2016, 02:55 PM
Y-dna has been my special interest since I got started in genetic genealogy back in April of 2006. Finding my y-dna immigrant ancestor is the Holy Grail of my genetic genealogy quest, but I would be thrilled with even another generation or two back.

My story as well. Shortly after my father died in 2005 I saw an article online regarding National Geographic's The Genographic project: https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/human-journey/. I submitted my sample, for free - if I recall, and received some basic information on my y-dna. It has been my intention ever since to translate that into my patrilineage ancestry. I believe most men have this interest.

Cascio
11-08-2016, 03:02 PM
No, his surname was Julius.
His first name was Gaius.
Caesar was a title.
The Romans had these family names back towards the founding of Rome.
According to my Latin teachers, long ago.

Caesar was his cognomen, or branch of the "gens" or clan.

Gaius was his personal name, Julius his gens and Caesar the branch of his gens.

Caesar became a title for later Roman emperors and spawned the titles Kaiser, Tsar and even Shah.

vettor
11-08-2016, 03:41 PM
so these surnames are still in use today?

Badoer was a driver for Ferrari F1 inside the last 20 years
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luca_Badoer

vettor
11-08-2016, 03:42 PM
It looks like the surnames Catarodi, Lutriani and Catapalumbo were being used in Benevento in 703 AD. By 819 AD, wealthy Venetian families used the surnames Badoer, Gradenigo and Contarini. After about 1000, the use really started to take off.

Source: I cognomi degli Italiani: Una storia lunga 1000 anni
https://books.google.com/books?id=4MOODAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

The oldest families in Venice called the lunghi group where pre 1200

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m153/vicpret/old%20ven_zpsc6tobkba.jpg (http://s103.photobucket.com/user/vicpret/media/old%20ven_zpsc6tobkba.jpg.html)

my grandmother is a Basegio

some of these came from odd theories
Like Michiel is a christian name = michael
Zorzi is another = George
Zane = John
Zustinian = gustinian ( maybe from Byzantine )
Malipiero = sick peter
Moro for colour Brown
Tron = Big chair

Tiepolo means "you and Paul " ..........referring to "meeting saint Paul "

corner
11-08-2016, 03:52 PM
It looks like the surnames Catarodi, Lutriani and Catapalumbo were being used in Benevento in 703 AD. By 819 AD, wealthy Venetian families used the surnames Badoer, Gradenigo and Contarini. After about 1000, the use really started to take off.

Source: I cognomi degli Italiani: Una storia lunga 1000 anni
https://books.google.com/books?id=4MOODAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false


so these surnames are still in use today?


The oldest families in Venice called the lunghi group where pre 1200

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m153/vicpret/old%20ven_zpsc6tobkba.jpg (http://s103.photobucket.com/user/vicpret/media/old%20ven_zpsc6tobkba.jpg.html)

my grandmother is a Basegio

some of these came from odd theories
Like Michiel is a christian name = michael
Zorzi is another = George
Zane = John
Zustinian = gustinian ( maybe from Byzantine )

Tiepolo means "you and Paul " ..........referring to "meeting saint Paul "Through surname research a while ago I found my surname, Corner (mentioned in the list, above), belonged to an early Venetian family. They claimed it traced back to Roman times. The name is now alternatively remembered as Cornaro in Italy but the original Venetian rendering was Corner and descendants still use Corner. They claimed descent from the Roman Cornelius family/gens (Scipio etc.). I think it's unlikely there's any yDNA connection to our old North Yorkshire farming/seafaring family - but you never know :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornaro_family

vettor
11-08-2016, 04:01 PM
Through surname research a while ago I found my surname, Corner (mentioned in the list, above), belonged to an early Venetian family. They claimed it traced back to Roman times. The name is now alternatively remembered as Cornaro in Italy but the original Venetian rendering was Corner and descendants still use Corner. They claimed descent from the Roman Cornelius family/gens (Scipio etc.). I think it's unlikely there's any yDNA connection to our old North Yorkshire farming/seafaring family - but you never know :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornaro_family

Yes, italy , Italianized many Venetian surnames like yours , from Corner to Cornaro .......another is Zen to Zeno ...........too many to name

so as above names are all from the Venetian government , with the Lunghi being pre 1200 and the "curti" group added after 1200.

your name seems to be in its pure form , some like

Mocenigo, Barbarigo, Gradenigo are typical surnames that had a venetian ending of igo added to it.

other venetian surname endings.........ato aio ito acco otto igo

below states origin of the very old surnames


Filone classico (classic times ) comprende i cognomi che derivano dalla tradizione di ceppo

latino( Latin origin ) (Bacco/Bacchin, Cesaro, Costantini, Giuliani),

( hebrew origin )ebraico (Gasparini, Lazzaro, Marchiori, Mattiuzzo, Sabbadin, Salamon, Sanson),

( greek origin ) greco (Andronico, Cristofori, Parisotto, Teodori),

( german origin ) germanico (Albertin/D’Alberton, Baldan, Bernardi, Berto, Dorigo, Frigo, Girardi, Gottardo, Heinz, Mazzon, Renier, Vendramin).